How Indian ads shaped our lives

Updated On Jun 09, 2016 04:06 PM IST 8 Photos
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Biscuits became a part of the staple diet, thanks to astute marketing by Parle G

Biscuits became a part of the staple diet, thanks to astute marketing by Parle G

Updated on Jun 09, 2016 04:06 PM IST
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To take on Parle-G glucose busciuts, arch-rival Britannia looked to one the most famous Bollywood villains: Gabbar Singh.

To take on Parle-G glucose busciuts, arch-rival Britannia looked to one the most famous Bollywood villains: Gabbar Singh.

Updated on Jun 09, 2016 04:06 PM IST
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Today’s young women might be affronted if they were told that the symbol of true marital love is a pressure cooker. But that’s what advertising portrayed. Prestige had a much-loved ad that ran for years espousing the cause of “pressure free” marital life. No wonder then, the pressure cooker is one of the most ubiquitous items in an Indian kitchen.

Today’s young women might be affronted if they were told that the symbol of true marital love is a pressure cooker. But that’s what advertising portrayed. Prestige had a much-loved ad that ran for years espousing the cause of “pressure free” marital life. No wonder then, the pressure cooker is one of the most ubiquitous items in an Indian kitchen.

Updated on Jun 09, 2016 04:06 PM IST
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Hindustan Lever taught Indians that using Dalda (it became to vanaspati what Xerox had to the photocopy) made food taste as good as cooked in ‘asli ghee’.

Hindustan Lever taught Indians that using Dalda (it became to vanaspati what Xerox had to the photocopy) made food taste as good as cooked in ‘asli ghee’.

Updated on Jun 09, 2016 04:06 PM IST
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In the days before mass television, ads were published via print and were aimed at affluent, suit-wearing audiences. And with the textile mills still running full-steam, suitings were once the most highly advertised category in India.

In the days before mass television, ads were published via print and were aimed at affluent, suit-wearing audiences. And with the textile mills still running full-steam, suitings were once the most highly advertised category in India.

Updated on Jun 09, 2016 04:06 PM IST
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Shekhar Kapur in a suting ad. Well into the ‘90s, nawabs, cricketers and actors modelled for suiting. It’s a small segment now, what with the advent of international designer and high-street brands, and now, online retail.

Shekhar Kapur in a suting ad. Well into the ‘90s, nawabs, cricketers and actors modelled for suiting. It’s a small segment now, what with the advent of international designer and high-street brands, and now, online retail.

Updated on Jun 09, 2016 04:06 PM IST
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Reggae music was used to sell milk; Baul to sell adhesives; Tabla to sell tea; and Hindustani classical music to sell “Hamara Bajaj” scooters. Make in India? We’ve been using the sentiment for years.

Reggae music was used to sell milk; Baul to sell adhesives; Tabla to sell tea; and Hindustani classical music to sell “Hamara Bajaj” scooters. Make in India? We’ve been using the sentiment for years.

Updated on Jun 09, 2016 04:06 PM IST
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Jobs continued to be a priority for young India. When that met the digital world, a humorous ad was born. A Naukri.com ad showed a subordinate spelling out his boss’s name: “H for Hitler. A for arrogant. R for rascal…I for Idiot.”A country determined to land just any white-collar job now wanted work satisfaction.

Jobs continued to be a priority for young India. When that met the digital world, a humorous ad was born. A Naukri.com ad showed a subordinate spelling out his boss’s name: “H for Hitler. A for arrogant. R for rascal…I for Idiot.”A country determined to land just any white-collar job now wanted work satisfaction.

Updated on Jun 09, 2016 04:06 PM IST
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