Photos: Sunder Nursery near Humayun’s Tomb opens as heritage park

UPDATED ON FEB 21, 2018 12:08 PM IST
Sunder Nursery, the renovated park spread over 90 acres of lush green lawns adjacent to Humayun’s Tomb in central Delhi’s Nizamuddin, is set to be opened for the public as a heritage park. The campus will be inaugurated by vice president Venkaiah Naidu in the presence of The Aga Khan on Wednesday. (Vipin Kumar / HT Photo)
A view of the Lakkharwala Gumbad in the Sunder Nursery lawns. Officials say that the garden will be next only to Lodhi Garden among the city’s parks in terms of heritage, flora and fauna. “The garden has 15 monuments, double the number at Lodhi Garden,” said Ratish Nanda, CEO, Aga Khan Trust for Culture (AKTC). (Vipin Kumar / HT Photo)
Ratish Nanda, CEO of the Aga (far, centre) seen explaining the mega renovation plan. “The site that once served as plant nursery for the British will now serve as Delhi’s first arboretum with nearly 300 tree species, the largest number in any of Delhi’s parks” he said. (Vipin Kumar / HT Photo)
Aga Khan Trust members and members of the press stroll around the newly renovated Sunder Nursery. The Archaeological Survey of India and the South Delhi Municipal Corporation along with the Aga Khan Trust for Culture (AKTC) started conservation and landscaping at the nursery in 2007. (Vipin Kumar / HT Photo)
A view of the interiors of Lakkharwala Burj. After an exhaustive 10 years, which involved removal of truckloads of construction rubble and plantation of 20,000 saplings, the site has now taken a shape of a park with distinct heritage, ecological and nursery zones already attracting 80 species of birds, including 60 butterfly varieties. (Vipin Kumar / HT Photo)
The garden is inspired by the Mughal tradition, employing lotus-shaped marble fountains and water flows amid geometric flower beds and raised sandstone pathways. The lake at the northern edge of the central axis will be a refuge for Delhi’s citizens with walks, seating and pavilions along the edge. (Vipin Kumar / HT Photo)
A sunken amphitheatre has also been created to host cultural evenings and music festivals. (Vipin Kumar / HT Photo)
A view of the water channel near the Sunder Burj tomb. Inspired by traditional Mughal gardens with Persian carpet patterns, the central axis acts as a primary pedestrian spine for visitors. It follows the path of the 16th century Grand Trunk Road connecting the entrance zone of Humayun’s Tomb World Heritage Site with the 16th century Azimganj Serai in the north. (Vipin Kumar / HT Photo)
A long view of the Sunderwala Mahal after restoration. “Landscape architect Late M Shaheer redesigned this park. The landscaping of the park includes Delhi’s first arboretum, an amphitheatre, ponds and lakes, nursery beds, a flower showcase, rose gardens and orchards,” Ratish Nanda added. (Vipin Kumar / HT Photo)

Sunder Nursery, the renovated park spread over 90 acres of lush green lawns adjacent to Humayun’s Tomb in central Delhi’s Nizamuddin, is set to be opened for the public as a heritage park. The campus will be inaugurated by vice president Venkaiah Naidu in the presence of The Aga Khan on Wednesday. (Vipin Kumar / HT Photo)

A view of the Lakkharwala Gumbad in the Sunder Nursery lawns. Officials say that the garden will be next only to Lodhi Garden among the city’s parks in terms of heritage, flora and fauna. “The garden has 15 monuments, double the number at Lodhi Garden,” said Ratish Nanda, CEO, Aga Khan Trust for Culture (AKTC). (Vipin Kumar / HT Photo)

Ratish Nanda, CEO of the Aga (far, centre) seen explaining the mega renovation plan. “The site that once served as plant nursery for the British will now serve as Delhi’s first arboretum with nearly 300 tree species, the largest number in any of Delhi’s parks” he said. (Vipin Kumar / HT Photo)

Aga Khan Trust members and members of the press stroll around the newly renovated Sunder Nursery. The Archaeological Survey of India and the South Delhi Municipal Corporation along with the Aga Khan Trust for Culture (AKTC) started conservation and landscaping at the nursery in 2007. (Vipin Kumar / HT Photo)

A view of the interiors of Lakkharwala Burj. After an exhaustive 10 years, which involved removal of truckloads of construction rubble and plantation of 20,000 saplings, the site has now taken a shape of a park with distinct heritage, ecological and nursery zones already attracting 80 species of birds, including 60 butterfly varieties. (Vipin Kumar / HT Photo)

The garden is inspired by the Mughal tradition, employing lotus-shaped marble fountains and water flows amid geometric flower beds and raised sandstone pathways. The lake at the northern edge of the central axis will be a refuge for Delhi’s citizens with walks, seating and pavilions along the edge. (Vipin Kumar / HT Photo)

A sunken amphitheatre has also been created to host cultural evenings and music festivals. (Vipin Kumar / HT Photo)

A view of the water channel near the Sunder Burj tomb. Inspired by traditional Mughal gardens with Persian carpet patterns, the central axis acts as a primary pedestrian spine for visitors. It follows the path of the 16th century Grand Trunk Road connecting the entrance zone of Humayun’s Tomb World Heritage Site with the 16th century Azimganj Serai in the north. (Vipin Kumar / HT Photo)

A long view of the Sunderwala Mahal after restoration. “Landscape architect Late M Shaheer redesigned this park. The landscaping of the park includes Delhi’s first arboretum, an amphitheatre, ponds and lakes, nursery beds, a flower showcase, rose gardens and orchards,” Ratish Nanda added. (Vipin Kumar / HT Photo)

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16th century Sunder Nursery located adjacent to the Humayun's Tomb in central Delhi's Nizamuddin is set to be opened for public on Wednesday after ten years of entensive renovation work. Tha campus will be inaugurated by vice president Venkaiah Naidu in the presence of Aga Khan.

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