PHOTOS: Hiker turns trash into art with ‘don’t drop litter’ message

UPDATED ON NOV 24, 2020 07:41 PM IST
Kim Kang-Eun, an artist who leads Clean Hikers, and her colleagues pose with signs bearing a message for hikers on a mountain in Incheon, South Korea, November 16, 2020. Picture taken November 16, 2020. (REUTERS)
Drawings by Kim Kang-Eun, an artist who leads Clean Hikers, and her colleagues are seen on a mountain in Incheon, South Korea, November 16, 2020. (REUTERS)
Kim Kang-Eun, an artist who leads Clean Hikers, collects litter while hiking a mountain in Incheon, South Korea, November 16, 2020. (REUTERS)
Kim Kang-Eun poses artwork made from litter collected by members of Clean Hikers during their hikes, on the peak of a mountain in Incheon, South Korea, November 16, 2020. (REUTERS)
Kim Kang-Eun gets ready with her colleagues to collect litter while hiking a mountain in Incheon, South Korea, November 16, 2020. (REUTERS)
Kim Kang-Eun collects a litter while hiking a mountain in Incheon, South Korea, November 16, 2020. (REUTERS)

Kim Kang-Eun, an artist who leads Clean Hikers, and her colleagues pose with signs bearing a message for hikers on a mountain in Incheon, South Korea, November 16, 2020. Picture taken November 16, 2020. (REUTERS)

Drawings by Kim Kang-Eun, an artist who leads Clean Hikers, and her colleagues are seen on a mountain in Incheon, South Korea, November 16, 2020. (REUTERS)

Kim Kang-Eun, an artist who leads Clean Hikers, collects litter while hiking a mountain in Incheon, South Korea, November 16, 2020. (REUTERS)

Kim Kang-Eun poses artwork made from litter collected by members of Clean Hikers during their hikes, on the peak of a mountain in Incheon, South Korea, November 16, 2020. (REUTERS)

Kim Kang-Eun gets ready with her colleagues to collect litter while hiking a mountain in Incheon, South Korea, November 16, 2020. (REUTERS)

Kim Kang-Eun collects a litter while hiking a mountain in Incheon, South Korea, November 16, 2020. (REUTERS)

About The Gallery

When hiker Kim Kang-eun found the slopes of Mount Jiri, South Korea’s largest national park, littered with rubbish during a two-day trip in 2018, she decided it was time to send out a message about taking better care of nature. She founded Clean Hikers, a group dedicated to picking up trash from there and the country’s other mountain parks and turning it into art. “Junk art is more compelling and well received by people, rather than just saying let’s not litter. We can make an interesting image and it attracts people’s attention,” 30-year-old Kim said. She spoke in front of a collage of a crying cat tagged with the slogan “Save the World”, created by herself and other members of the group on the summit of Mount Mani on Ganghwa Island, a park outside Seoul where many stray cats roam.

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