Photos: A new nationwide lockdown in France as Covid-19 cases surge

After enduring two months of lockdown between March and May in a bid to squeeze the coronavirus, there was a weary sense of deja-vu in France on October 30 as people contemplated going through it all again for at least a month -- and maybe even to Christmas and beyond. All French residents have been ordered to stay at home at all times with no visitors, or risk steep fines or prosecution. A resurgent coronavirus pandemic is increasingly forcing other countries to consider following suit, with Europe passing 10 million total infections and the United States posting a daily record of 100,000 cases.

Updated On Oct 31, 2020 06:04 PM IST
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A woman walks near the Eiffel Tower in Paris, on the first day of a new month-long nationwide lockdown across France, on October 30. From midnight, France’s 65 million people were largely confined to their homes, needing written statements to leave, in the latest drastic measure to curb a disease that has infected more than 45 million people worldwide and killed nearly 1.2 million. (Thibault Camus / AP)
Updated on Oct 31, 2020 06:04 PM IST

A woman walks near the Eiffel Tower in Paris, on the first day of a new month-long nationwide lockdown across France, on October 30. From midnight, France’s 65 million people were largely confined to their homes, needing written statements to leave, in the latest drastic measure to curb a disease that has infected more than 45 million people worldwide and killed nearly 1.2 million. (Thibault Camus / AP)

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Traffic on the Champs Elysees, on the eve of the national lockdown, in Paris on October 29. Parisians fleeing for the countryside jammed the roads ahead of the lockdown coming into effect. Dystopian images of logjams — exacerbated by the upcoming long holiday weekend — were a grim sign of a return to the dark days of the spring, when virus cases first swelled in Europe. (Nathan Laine / Bloomberg)
Updated on Oct 31, 2020 06:04 PM IST

Traffic on the Champs Elysees, on the eve of the national lockdown, in Paris on October 29. Parisians fleeing for the countryside jammed the roads ahead of the lockdown coming into effect. Dystopian images of logjams — exacerbated by the upcoming long holiday weekend — were a grim sign of a return to the dark days of the spring, when virus cases first swelled in Europe. (Nathan Laine / Bloomberg)

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A police personnel checks a person for valid permission to be out in public, on the first day of the second national lockdown, in Paris on October 30. According to a poll by Odoxa-Dentsu Consulting for France Info and Le Figaro, seven out of 10 people in France are in favour of the new lockdown, which is scheduled to last a month. Travel between regions has also been limited. (Charles Platiau / REUTERS)
Updated on Oct 31, 2020 06:04 PM IST

A police personnel checks a person for valid permission to be out in public, on the first day of the second national lockdown, in Paris on October 30. According to a poll by Odoxa-Dentsu Consulting for France Info and Le Figaro, seven out of 10 people in France are in favour of the new lockdown, which is scheduled to last a month. Travel between regions has also been limited. (Charles Platiau / REUTERS)

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People seated distantly on a bench in Strasbourg, on October 30. There are a handful of exceptions, such as being allowed out for one hour of exercise a day within a 1 kilometer of home, to go to medical appointments, to a place of work, or to shop for essential goods. Restaurants and cafés are shuttered, apart from those that offer takeout. (Patrick Hertzog / AFP)
Updated on Oct 31, 2020 06:04 PM IST

People seated distantly on a bench in Strasbourg, on October 30. There are a handful of exceptions, such as being allowed out for one hour of exercise a day within a 1 kilometer of home, to go to medical appointments, to a place of work, or to shop for essential goods. Restaurants and cafés are shuttered, apart from those that offer takeout. (Patrick Hertzog / AFP)

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A couple walks in a cemetery in Strasbourg on October 30. President Emmanuel Macron has warned that the second wave “will probably be more difficult and deadly than the first” in a country that has already seen 36,000 deaths from Covid-19. (Patrick Hertzog / AFP)
Updated on Oct 31, 2020 06:04 PM IST

A couple walks in a cemetery in Strasbourg on October 30. President Emmanuel Macron has warned that the second wave “will probably be more difficult and deadly than the first” in a country that has already seen 36,000 deaths from Covid-19. (Patrick Hertzog / AFP)

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People walk on the beach on the first day of the nationwide lockdown, in Saint Jean de Luz on October 30. New daily cases of Covid-19 are currently averaging around 50,000 in France. On a per capita basis, France is seeing about two and a half times the number of new cases each day than the United States, AP reported. (Bob Edme / AP)
Updated on Oct 31, 2020 06:04 PM IST

People walk on the beach on the first day of the nationwide lockdown, in Saint Jean de Luz on October 30. New daily cases of Covid-19 are currently averaging around 50,000 in France. On a per capita basis, France is seeing about two and a half times the number of new cases each day than the United States, AP reported. (Bob Edme / AP)

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Demonstrators hold a banner reading “No nationwide lockdown” in Hendaye on October 30. Some angry citizens also took to the streets of Paris late on October 29 for an unauthorised protest to condemn the new measures as overly drastic. (Bob Edme / AP)
Updated on Oct 31, 2020 06:04 PM IST

Demonstrators hold a banner reading “No nationwide lockdown” in Hendaye on October 30. Some angry citizens also took to the streets of Paris late on October 29 for an unauthorised protest to condemn the new measures as overly drastic. (Bob Edme / AP)

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A newly married couple walk by the empty Louvre museum in Paris on October 30. Within a space of months France has gone from “confinement” (lockdown), to “deconfinement” as the measures were relaxed over the summer, to “reconfinement.” (Lewis Joly / AP)
Updated on Oct 31, 2020 06:04 PM IST

A newly married couple walk by the empty Louvre museum in Paris on October 30. Within a space of months France has gone from “confinement” (lockdown), to “deconfinement” as the measures were relaxed over the summer, to “reconfinement.” (Lewis Joly / AP)

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A man walks in Montmartre area of Paris, on October 30. The new lockdown adds to an already grim mood in France after three attacks in recent weeks blamed on Islamist extremists, the latest the killing of three people inside a church in Nice on October 29. (Lewis Joly / AP)
Updated on Oct 31, 2020 06:04 PM IST

A man walks in Montmartre area of Paris, on October 30. The new lockdown adds to an already grim mood in France after three attacks in recent weeks blamed on Islamist extremists, the latest the killing of three people inside a church in Nice on October 29. (Lewis Joly / AP)

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