‘Before lunchtime, or after lunch': Putin ally predicts Russian victory over Mariupol on Thursday

Published on Apr 21, 2022 05:52 AM IST

Mariupol would be the biggest city to be seized by Russia since invading Ukraine eight weeks ago in an attack that has taken longer than some military analysts expected.

A view shows damaged buildings, with the Azovstal Iron and Steel Works plant in the background, in the southern port city of Mariupol, Ukraine.(REUTERS)
A view shows damaged buildings, with the Azovstal Iron and Steel Works plant in the background, in the southern port city of Mariupol, Ukraine.(REUTERS)
Reuters |

Russian forces said they will seize the Mariupol steel plant that is the last main stronghold of resistance in the besieged city on Thursday after Ukraine proposed talks on evacuating troops and civilians there.

Mariupol would be the biggest city to be seized by Russia since invading Ukraine eight weeks ago in an attack that has taken longer than some military analysts expected, seen over five million people flee abroad and turned towns and cities to rubble.

"Before lunchtime, or after lunch, Azovstal will be completely under the control of the forces of the Russian Federation," Ramzan Kadyrov, the head of Russia's republic of Chechnya, whose forces have been fighting in Ukraine, said of the steel plant.

Ukraine's defence ministry was not immediately available for comment.

A few dozen civilians managed to leave the strategically important southeastern port on Wednesday in a small bus convoy, according to Reuters witnesses, escaping the fiercest battle of the war.

A Ukrainian marine commander, Serhiy Volny, said on Wednesday fighters at the steel works may not be able to hold out for much longer. President Volodymyr Zelenskiy has said an estimated 1,000 civilians are also sheltering there.

Ukraine is ready for a "special round of negotiations" with no conditions "to save our guys, (the far right) Azov (battalion), military, civilians, children, the living and the wounded," negotiator Mykhailo Podolyak tweeted.

Fighters remain holed up in the plant and have ignored an ultimatum by Russia to surrender. David Arakhamia, a second negotiator, said in an online post that he and Podolyak were in constant contact with Ukrainian forces in the city.

"Today, in a conversation with the city defenders, a proposal was put forward to hold direct negotiations, on site, on the evacuation of our military garrison," he said. "For our part, we are ready to arrive for such negotiations at any time as soon as we receive confirmation from the Russian side."

Fewer civilians than hoped left on Wednesday, according to the authorities.

Ukraine said it had so far held off an assault by thousands of Russian troops attempting to advance in what Kyiv calls the Battle of the Donbas, a new campaign to seize two eastern provinces Moscow claims on behalf of separatists.

Russia's forces had carried out strikes on dozens of military facilities in eastern Ukraine and had shot down a Ukrainian Mi-8 helicopter near the village of Koroviy Yar, its defence ministry said.

On Wednesday, Russia conducted a first test launch of its Sarmat intercontinental ballistic missile, a new and long-awaited addition to its nuclear arsenal.

"This truly unique weapon will ... provide food for thought for those who, in the heat of frenzied aggressive rhetoric, try to threaten our country," President Vladimir Putin said.

Russia calls its incursion a "special military operation" to demilitarise and "denazify" Ukraine. Kyiv and its Western allies reject that as a false pretext.

The West has responded with a slew of sanctions.

The United States on Wednesday imposed restrictions on dozens of people and entities, including a commercial bank and a virtual currency mining company, targeting the evasion of existing rules.

BILLOWING CLOUDS OF SMOKE

Mariupol, once a prosperous city of 400,000, is now a wasteland where corpses lie in the streets and Russia was hitting the Azovstal steel plant with bunker-buster bombs, the government in Kyiv said.

Large black clouds of smoke billowed from there on Wednesday as evacuees queued to get onto buses.

Pensioner Tamara, 64, said she was going to stay with her sister in Zaporizhzhia. She was leaving the city with her husband, daughter, son-in-law and grandson.

"It is a pleasure ... to leave after this nightmare. We lived in basements for 30 days," she said tearfully.

Ukraine's Deputy Prime Minister Iryna Vereshchuk accused Russian forces of failing to observe a local ceasefire agreement long enough to allow large numbers of people to leave.

Russia did not immediately respond to the allegation.

It denies targeting civilians and has blamed Ukraine for the failure of earlier attempts to organise humanitarian corridors out of Mariupol.

The deputy commander of the Azov Regiment in Mariupol, Svyatoslav Kalamar, said several bunkers under the plant still held about 80-100 civilians each.

Just five people in Mariupol had surrendered following Moscow's 2 p.m. (1100 GMT) surrender-or-die ultimatum, Russian-backed separatists said.

Ukraine has proposed swapping Russian prisoners of war in exchange for safe passage for trapped civilians and soldiers.

If Russia captured Mariupol it would link territory held by pro-Russian separatists in the east with the Crimea region that Moscow annexed in 2014.

Moscow was forced to retreat from northern Ukraine after an assault on Kyiv was repelled last month, but has poured troops back in for an assault on the east that began this week.

Putin says Ukraine mistreated Russian speakers in the Donbas, an accusation Kyiv dismisses as false.

Russia was focusing on advancing towards the strategically important Donbas city of Sloviansk, but "so far they are not succeeding", Ukrainian presidential advisor Oleksiy Arestovych said.

Meanwhile, peace negotiations have stalled.

The Kremlin accused Kyiv on Wednesday of delaying the talks and changing its positions. Kyiv accuses Moscow of blocking talks by refusing humanitarian ceasefires.

 

(Reporting by Reuters journalists; Writing by Costas Pitas; Editing by Grant McCool)

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