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Home / World News / Libya’s warring factions sign UN- brokered, ‘permanent’ ceasefire

Libya’s warring factions sign UN- brokered, ‘permanent’ ceasefire

The breakthrough, which among other things orders foreign mercenaries out of the country, sets the stage for political talks in November to find a lasting solution to the chaos unleashed after a 2011 Nato-backed uprising toppled and killed longtime dictator Moammar Gadhafi.

world Updated: Oct 24, 2020, 03:23 IST
Associated Press
Associated Press
Geneva
Previous diplomatic initiatives to end the conflict have repeatedly collapsed - but the UN-brokered deal aims to cement a months-long lull in fighting and gives a boost to the political process.
Previous diplomatic initiatives to end the conflict have repeatedly collapsed - but the UN-brokered deal aims to cement a months-long lull in fighting and gives a boost to the political process.(REUTERS)

The rival sides in Libya’s conflict signed a “permanent” ceasefire on Friday, a deal the United Nations billed as historic after years of fighting that has split the North African country in two. But scepticism over whether the agreement would hold began emerging almost immediately.

The breakthrough, which among other things orders foreign mercenaries out of the country, sets the stage for political talks in November to find a lasting solution to the chaos unleashed after a 2011 Nato-backed uprising toppled and killed longtime dictator Moammar Gadhafi.

Previous diplomatic initiatives to end the conflict have repeatedly collapsed - but the UN-brokered deal aims to cement a months-long lull in fighting and gives a boost to the political process.

 

“I am honoured to be among you today to witness a moment that will go down in history,” Stephanie Turco Williams, the top UN envoy for Libya who led mediation talks this week, said at the signing in Geneva. She did, however, express some caution, noting that a “long and difficult” road remains ahead.

It’s not clear how the cease-fire will be enforced.

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