At least 8 dead as barrage of rocket fire hits Kabul

Kabul police spokesman Ferdaws Faramarz confirmed the same death toll and details, while health ministry spokeswoman Masooma Jafari put the toll at five dead, 21 wounded.
People inspect a damaged house after several rockets land at Khair Khana, north west of Kabul(AFP)
People inspect a damaged house after several rockets land at Khair Khana, north west of Kabul(AFP)
Updated on Nov 21, 2020 01:36 PM IST
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Kabul | ByAgence France-Presse| Posted by Susmita Pakrasi

At least eight people were killed Saturday when a barrage of rockets struck densely populated parts of Kabul, officials said, marking the latest attack in an ongoing wave of violence sweeping the Afghan capital.

“The terrorists fired 23 rockets on the city of Kabul. Based on the initial information, eight people were martyred, and 31 others were wounded,” said interior ministry spokesman Tariq Arian, who blamed the Taliban for the attack. A police source also confirmed the toll.

The salvo slammed into various parts of central and north Kabul -- including near the heavily fortified Green Zone that houses embassies and international companies -- just before 9:00 am (0430 GMT).

“This morning, the terrorists fired 14 rockets on the city of Kabul,” interior ministry spokesman Tariq Arian said.

Photos and videos circulating online showed several buildings with damage to walls and windows, including at a large a medical complex.

No group immediately claimed the blasts and the Taliban denied responsibility.

Recent big attacks in Kabul, including two horrific assaults on educational institutions that killed nearly 50 people in recent weeks, follow a familiar pattern in the aftermath, with the Taliban denying any involvement while the Afghan government pins the blame on them or their proxies.

“The rocket attack in Kabul city has nothing to do with the mujahideen of the Islamic Emirate,” Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid said, using the insurgents’ name for Afghanistan.

“We do not blindly fire on public places.”

The Taliban are under pressure not to attack urban areas, having pledged not to do so under the terms of a US withdrawal deal signed in February.

Any acknowledgement of overt involvement in such incidents could in theory slow the American pull-out, though outgoing US President Donald Trump has made clear that he wants US forces out regardless of the situation on the ground.

The Islamic State group claimed the two attacks on educational centres, but Kabul said the Taliban’s ultra-violent Haqqani network was responsible.

- Pompeo heads to Doha -

Taliban and Afghan government negotiators launched peace talks in Doha in September but progress has been slow and violence has raged across Afghanistan regardless.

Officials told AFP on Friday however that a breakthrough was expected to be announced in the coming days, and the US State Department announced late Friday that Secretary of State Mike Pompeo would meet negotiators from the Taliban and the Afghan government in Doha.

Trump has repeatedly vowed to end “forever wars,” including in Afghanistan, America’s longest-ever conflict that began with an invasion to dislodge the Taliban following the September 11, 2001 attacks.

President-elect Joe Biden, in a rare point of agreement, also advocates winding down the Afghanistan war although analysts believe he will not be as wedded to a quick timetable.

Earlier this week, the Pentagon said it would soon pull some 2,000 troops out of Afghanistan, speeding up the timeline established in a February agreement between Washington and the Taliban that envisions a full US withdrawal in mid-2021.

In the past six months, the Taliban carried out 53 suicide attacks and 1,250 explosions that left 1,210 civilians dead and 2,500 wounded, interior ministry spokesman Tariq Arian said this week.

The interior ministry said two small “sticky bomb” explosions had been reported earlier Saturday morning, including one that hit a police car, killing one policeman and wounding three others.

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