Indonesia builds sanctuary to save world's rarest rhino

Conservationists are hoping that the country's first ever Javan rhino sanctuary, which will open in the Ujung Kulon National Park in the coming months, can pull the animal back from the brink of extinction.
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Updated on Dec 24, 2013 10:44 PM IST
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AFP | By, Ujung Kulon (indonesia)

On a leaf-covered dirt path overlooking lush paddy fields in western Indonesia, the world's rarest rhino had left a trail of hoofprints in the soft mud and bite marks on foliage.

For people seeking a glimpse of the Javan rhino - revered in local folklore as Abah Gede, or the Great Father - such small signs are likely to be the closest they get.

There are thought to be only around 50 of the animals left in existence, all living in the wild in Ujung Kulon National Park, an area of stunning natural beauty on the western tip of Indonesia's main island of Java.

But now conservationists are hoping that the country's first ever Javan rhino sanctuary, which will open in the park in the coming months, can pull the animal back from the brink of extinction.

The shy creature, whose folds of loose skin give it the appearance of wearing armour plating, once numbered in the thousands and roamed across Southeast Asia.

This handout picture shows a rhino taking care of its calf at Indonesia's Ujung Kulon National Park. (AFP photo/Ujung Kulon National Park)
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This handout picture shows a rhino taking care of its calf at Indonesia's Ujung Kulon National Park. (AFP photo/Ujung Kulon National Park)

But, like other rhino species across the world, poaching and human encroachment on its habitat has led to a dramatic population decline, with the International Union for Conservation of Nature saying the animal is "making its last stand".

The new sanctuary will encompass 12,600 acres of lush rainforest, freshwater streams and mudholes in the park, which is a UNESCO World Heritage site.

It is not due to open until March but park officials say that from hoofprints and bite marks, they believe nine rhinos have already wandered into new areas set aside for them.

"It means our scheme to turn this sanctuary into a comfortable home for them is working," the park's habitat manager Rusdianto, who like many Indonesians goes by one name, told AFP.

This picture taken on November 16, 2013 shows Indonesian rangers walking past a statue marking Ujung Kulon National Park in Indonesia's Banten province. (AFP Photo)
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This picture taken on November 16, 2013 shows Indonesian rangers walking past a statue marking Ujung Kulon National Park in Indonesia's Banten province. (AFP Photo)

The rhinos were already living mainly in one corner of the park.

But the new sanctuary has expanded the area suitable for them and relocated farmers who were living there to reduce the chances of animal-human conflict.

An electric fence is also being constructed - the final piece of work that needs to be completed - to mark the boundary and prevent the rhinos from straying out of the sanctuary and humans from coming in.

Park officials, who are government employees, have also been planting suitable food for the rhinos. During a recent visit by AFP, workers were seen clearing palm trees from the area and replacing them with shrubs and small trees.

"We hope this sanctuary will hasten breeding and lead to more births of this treasured rare animal," park chief Moh Haryono told AFP.

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