Pakistan making more deadly, deliverable nukes: US think tank

Updated on May 29, 2009 08:00 AM IST

Pakistan is likely supplementing or replacing its current uranium-based nuclear weapon arsenal with plutonium-based weapons that will be more destructive and deliverable, says a US think tank.

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IANS | By, Washington

Pakistan is likely supplementing or replacing its current uranium-based nuclear weapon arsenal with plutonium-based weapons that will be more destructive and deliverable, says a US think tank.

In the last two weeks, Pakistan has sought to turn the public debate over its nuclear programme into a binary choice between Pakistan expanding its programme and Pakistan modernising its programme, Institute for Science and International Security (ISIS) said on Thursday reacting to a Washington Post report.

The truth, however, is more complex, the Washington based think tank said. "Pakistan is likely supplementing or replacing its current uranium-based nuclear weapon arsenal with plutonium-based weapons which will be more destructive and deliverable."

In the wake of North Korea's underground nuclear test, the Post, it noted, had "called Pakistan's imminent development of nuclear-tipped cruise missiles and perhaps thermonuclear weapons a sign of a 'more mature' programme, as if to imply that more destructive nuclear weapons somehow lead to a better nation."

"The misuse of language has often occurred in debates over nuclear arsenals, particularly during the Cold War, as adversaries tried to make the horrible look bearable," ISIS said adding, "Words such as 'modernisation' were carefully used to distort the debates over nuclear weapon systems,

By incorrectly describing what is going on in Pakistan, these choices of words distort the debate before it even starts. Debates over conventional weapons are spared these distortions, ISIS said. "Few would say, for example, that the possession of semi-automatic weapons by criminals is a sign of a more mature criminal."

"Modernising" a nuclear weapons programme, rather, should at most be interpreted as improving the security of existing nuclear weapons, increasing security of fissile material in storage, at military and civilian nuclear industrial sites, or in transit," the think tank said.

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  • ABOUT THE AUTHOR

    Arun Kumar is Senior Assistant Editor with Hindustan Times. He has spent two-and-half decades covering Bihar, including politics, educational and social issues.

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