Taliban wanted to enter India after overrunning Pakistan: Malik

Pakistan's Interior Minister Rehman Malik has said that had the Taliban militants overrun his country, their next targets would have been India and Bangladesh. Pakistani Taliban last year warned that it would dispatch terrorists to fight India, once an Islamic state had been created in Pakistan.
HT Image
HT Image
Updated on Jun 27, 2010 07:51 PM IST
Copy Link
PTI | By, Islamabad

Pakistan's Interior Minister Rehman Malik has said that had the Taliban militants overrun his country, their next targets would have been India and Bangladesh.

"India and Bangladesh would have been next if the Taliban had taken over Pakistan," Malik told reporters while
briefing them on the outcome of the meeting of SAARC Interior Ministers here on Saturday.

Pakistani Taliban last year warned that it would dispatch terrorists to fight India, once an Islamic state had been created in Pakistan.

"We want an Islamic state (in Pakistan). If we get that, then we will go to the borders and help fight the Indians," Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan's slain chief Hakimullah Mehsud had warned in footage aired by Britain's Sky News channel in October last year.

At the SAARC briefing, Malik contended that Pakistan's actions against the Taliban had helped improve regional security.

Pakistan's actions against the Taliban will continue till they are eradicated, he added.

Under US pressure, Pakistan launched a military offensive in May last year against militants and pushed them out of the Taliban bastion of Swat.

The militants then conquered neighbouring districts, including one just 100 km northwest of Islamabad. The brazen Taliban advances set alarm bells ringing in many world capitals.

SHARE THIS ARTICLE ON
Close Story
QUICKREADS

Less time to read?

Try Quickreads

  • The Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama watching at a block of ice from the Khardung La glacier presented to him by India's climate activist Sonam Wangchuk (not pictured) on the occasion of the Earth Day in McLeod Ganj. (AFP)

    China accuses US of ‘interference’ after top official meets the Dalai Lama

    Beijing on Thursday criticised the meeting of a senior American diplomat and the 14th Dalai Lama, calling it a violation of Washington's commitment to the position that Tibet is a part of China. Explicitly referring to the Dalai Lama as a “separatist”, the Chinese foreign ministry said the US also interfered in its “internal affairs” by appointing a special official for Tibetan affairs.

  • Russian soldier Vadim Shishimarin, 21, suspected of violations of the laws and norms of war, is seen inside a defendants' cage during a court hearing in Kyiv, Ukraine May 18, 2022. REUTERS/Vladyslav Musiienko

    'Forgive me…': Russian solider to wife of Ukraine civilian he murdered

    'I acknowledge my blame… I ask you to forgive me' - the words of a 21-year-old Russian soldier on trial for war crimes in Ukraine, specifically the killing of an unarmed 62-year-old civilian in the northeast Ukrainian village of Chupakhivka on February 28. A tank commander, Vadim Shishimarin, is the first Russian soldier to stand trial for war crimes in Ukraine and pleaded guilty Wednesday.

  • Indonesia to lift ban on palm oil exports from May 23 (Reuters)

    Indonesia to lift ban on palm oil exports from May 23

    Indonesia will lift its ban on palm oil exports next week, President Joko Widodo said Thursday, relieving pressure on the global vegetable oil market after prices spiked because of the suspension and the war in Ukraine. "The government will still be monitoring everything strictly to ensure the demand will be met with affordable prices," he said. Widodo said prices had fallen from 19,800 rupiah ($1.35) per litre to about 17,200 rupiah ($1.17) since the ban.

  • A protest march in Colombo, Sri Lanka. 

    Sri Lanka lowers amount of foreign currency people can hold amid economic crisis

    Sri Lanka will lower the amount of foreign currency that individuals can hold to $10,000 from $15,000, and penalize anyone who holds foreign currency for more than three months by making it against the law, the island nation's central bank chief announced Thursday amid the worst economic crisis in recent memory. Shortages of hard currency have also hindered imports of raw materials for manufacturing and worsened inflation.

  • An employee of Songyo Knitwear Factory in Songyo district disinfects the work floor in Pyongyang, North Korea (AP Photo/Jon Chol Jin)

    North Korea's suspected Covid-19 caseload nears two million

    North Korea on Thursday reported 262,270 more suspected COVID-19 cases as its pandemic caseload neared 2 million — a week after the country acknowledged the outbreak and scrambled to slow infections in its unvaccinated population. The official Korean Central News Agency said more than 1.98 million people have become sick with fever since late April. At least 740,160 people are in quarantine, the news agency reported.

SHARE
Story Saved
×
Saved Articles
Following
My Reads
Sign out
New Delhi 0C
Thursday, May 19, 2022