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Home / Chandigarh / Frequent power outages give Ambala residents sleepless nights

Frequent power outages give Ambala residents sleepless nights

Superintendent engineer Rakesh Khanna said these are not power cuts but transmission issues due to an accident near Baldev Nagar

chandigarh Updated: Jun 30, 2020 20:31 IST
Bhavey Nagpal
Bhavey Nagpal
Hindustan Times, Chandigarh
Hindustantimes

Frequent power cuts in the sweltering heat have resulted in sleepless nights for Ambala residents.

Locals from various parts of cantonment and city said there have been frequent power cuts in their area for the last one week, especially at night.

A resident of New Colony in Ambala cantonment said power disruptions have become the norm for the last few weeks and there is no redressal of complainants.

“There have been frequent power cuts in my area and an official said there is a fuse problem that is yet to be repaired. Power cuts at night are most frustrating. We have tried to call officials of the electricity department from the area but there is no response,” said Manoj, an employee with a local private company.

Another resident from city’s Prem Nagar area, Dinesh Gulati, said power disruptions at night for the last three to four days are making their lives difficult.

However, superintendent engineer Rakesh Khanna said these are not power cuts but transmission issues due to an accident near Baldev Nagar area.

“Due to an accident near Baldev Nagar, we had to transfer the load to other areas nearby, which lead to some transmission issues. Generally, fixing such issues takes time and a fault in transfer affects nearly 300 homes connected to it. We have fixed this in Mahesh Nagar area and hope there are no more complaints,” he said.

On being asked about increase in consumption, Khanna said, “Yes, there has been a slight rise in urban consumption over the last few days in both city and cantonment compared to last year. There is also an estimated rise of 30% to 40% in summers.”

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