Delhiwale: Happy birthday, Tolstoy

Updated on Sep 09, 2022 01:40 PM IST

Sonu, the shoe repairer, sits by the lane’s signage that bears the writer’s name in Hindi, English, Punjabi, Urdu, but not in Russian. Sonu has been running this stall for more than a decade.

Being a back alley, Tolstoy Lane is more intimate than the busier Tolstoy Marg. PREMIUM
Being a back alley, Tolstoy Lane is more intimate than the busier Tolstoy Marg.
ByMayank Austen Soofi

No Natasha. No Pierre. No Vronsky. No Anna Karenina. Not one of them is here.

Some may suggest they be looked for in the pages of Leo Tolstoy’s novels. But this is Delhi’s Connaught Place, entrenched with the spirit of the Russian novelist — and it’s his birthday today (the 194th birthday, in fact).

Here, Tolstoy Lane merges into the statelier Tolstoy Marg, and at the point where Tolstoy Marg starts you can see a tall bronze statue of the bearded Tolstoy (see photo).

Oh, and a multi-storey complex on Tolstoy Marg is called Tolstoy House.

It is a rare thing for a writer to have given his name to so many landmarks in one of the most exclusive zones of the national capital.

Being a back alley, Tolstoy Lane is more intimate than the busier Tolstoy Marg.

Sonu, the shoe repairer, sits by the lane’s signage that bears the writer’s name in Hindi, English, Punjabi, Urdu, but not in Russian. Sonu has been running this stall for more than a decade. Pointing to the Jamun tree above, he says “their season ended some days ago… the jamuns would keep falling on me, they were delicious.”

As for ice cream hawker Ram Dular Pandey, he has been manning his cart in the Tolstoy land for 30 years. Looking seriously towards the lane, he speaks of the old days, when it would get as deserted as a jungle by 5pm. “Now there are two beer bars.” He talks of the nearby Saravana Bhavan restaurant, which draws a great crowd during lunchtime, and remembers the time Sona Rupa restaurant stood at the spot. A car repair workshop stood there, he says, pointing to a McDonald’s.

Tolstoy Lane has vestiges of its past in the form of cobwebbed windows that don’t seem to have been opened for years. A few longtime car repair workshops survive. Mechanic Muhammed Shakir points to a tall office building that has come up on the lane. It’s so new that it still hasn’t got a name, he says. “Two bungalows used to stood here. I knew the families living in those houses, I have seen the houses being demolished, and I have also seen this new building being built.” The edifice looks very modern, with a pipe running along the middle of its walls, faintly evocative of the colourful pipes that speckle the exterior of Paris’s Pompidou museum. And now a stylish woman appears in a white dress, seeming to bring the glamour of a ballroom with her. OK sorry, this line is pure fiction, being the entry scene of Princess Hélène in War and Peace.

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