The vacation started on April 20 and will continue till June 6, during which period there will be no online classes, except activity lessons.(Sunil Ghosh/HT Photo)
The vacation started on April 20 and will continue till June 6, during which period there will be no online classes, except activity lessons.(Sunil Ghosh/HT Photo)

Hobby classes in schools to utilise summer break

  • Taking lessons from her entrepreneurship classes, Nisha Yadav (15), a Class 11 student of a government school in Shakarpur, is now working on her own website by following YouTube tutorials.
By Kainat Sarfaraz, Hindustan Times, New Delhi
PUBLISHED ON MAY 15, 2021 03:06 AM IST

With schools in the national capital closed for an early summer break, children are now pursuing their hobbies, engaging in extra-curricular activities, taking up entrepreneurial activities, and even volunteering for Covid relief using digital platforms.

Taking lessons from her entrepreneurship classes, Nisha Yadav (15), a Class 11 student of a government school in Shakarpur, is now working on her own website by following YouTube tutorials. “I am trying to design an e-commerce platform for people living in villages so that they can get groceries and basic necessities at their doorstep,” said Yadav.

On April 19, the Delhi government ordered public and private schools in the Capital to begin their summer vacation three weeks earlier than planned, amid the rising Covid cases. The vacation started on April 20 and will continue till June 6, during which period there will be no online classes, except activity lessons.

Recognising the need to maintain connection with children, several top private schools in the city, such as The Indian School, Springdales in Pusa Road, Mount Abu Public School in Rohini, and Tagore International School in Vasant Vihar, are organising experiential activities and hobby classes online.

For instance, Modern Public School in Shalimar Bagh has tied up with various private firms and alumni associations to offer online summer internships to its students of classes 9 to 12 on various topics. Class 12 student Bhavidhi Malhotra, who had enrolled for an internship last year, opted for two this time. “One is on astrophysics and the other is on psychology. Since the workshops are online, I can easily attend them and keep myself engaged,” she said.

Several cultural centres are also offering language courses. For instance, Korean Cultural Centre, India, (KCCI) has offered a Korean Language program as a hobby class in eight schools. “Due to the increasing popularity of K-pop and K-drama, Korean language has been gaining global popularity in recent years, specially in India,” Hwang IL Yong, Director, KCCI, said.

For primary classes, schools are using innovative approaches to keep them engaged. Vandana Tiwari, a teacher at The Indian School, said, “Children in classes 1 to 5 are being engaged in lessons involving experiments that can be done at home.”

Several senior students are also engaging in Covid relief work by collating resources, arranging for food and ration for the marginalised. “We started a helpline number last year during the lockdown. So we are continuing with it this year and are arranging for meals, ration, or medicines based on the needs of the people who call,” said Asees Kandhari, a Class 12 student.

Schools have also offered counselling services for children unable to cope with the stress of the pandemic. For instance, Mount Abu Public School has started a helpline for its students and teachers.

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