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GMDA to repair, de-silt drains to prevent road cave-ins

In a bid to prevent road cave-ins during monsoon, the Gurugram Metropolitan Development Authority (GMDA) proposed a project to repair sewer lines across the city and de-silt them, officials said on Wednesday
By Suparna Roy, Gurugram
PUBLISHED ON APR 07, 2021 10:58 PM IST

In a bid to prevent road cave-ins during monsoon, the Gurugram Metropolitan Development Authority (GMDA) proposed a project to repair sewer lines across the city and de-silt them, officials said on Wednesday. A proposal for the project, along with rehabilitation and strengthening of old master sewer lines, is likely to be tabled before the chief minister for approval during the authority’s board meeting scheduled on Friday.

“During monsoon, overflow from drains and sewer lines is reported from many areas and to curb that, we have made this proposal with the idea of Gurugram heading towards a silt-free area. This will be a round-the-clock project with special focus on areas where all kinds of waste are dumped in the sewer lines, leading to heavy silting and blockage,” said Pradeep Kumar, chief engineer for infrastructure-II division of GMDA.

Kumar said that such areas are being identified and work will start after approval. However, no timeline has been set for the completion of the work.

According to GMDA officials, instances of heavy waste in sewer lines have been often reported from Iffco Chowk and stretches along the Mehrauli-Gurugram Road in the past few years. With roads built over the sewer lines, there is a potential danger of accidents, if the sewer line breaks due to pressure, he said.

The city has a 135-kilometre-long sewer network, for which de-silting will be done in phases. The authority has already carried out de-silting (as part of other projects currently underway) for 33 kilometres and an estimate for de-silting 53 kilometres has been made. De-silting will not be needed for 25 kilometres of the network as the sewer lines are comparatively new, said officials.

The project is estimated to cost around 130 crore.

Kumar said, “Due to production of gases like methane, carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulphite and others, the internal surface of the pipelines that have been there for over 25-30 years starts decaying. Over time, stretches where heavy waste (like industrial waste) is dumped in sewer lines become more prone to damage and for that, we have planned to repair some particular stretches.”

The authority has also kept a provision for cured in place pipe (CIPP) for repairing sewer lines on a 15-kilometre stretch. Such repair work has already been done over 9 kilometres in the last year. Through CIPP, specific stretches of the sewer network where heavy damage has been caused, due to accumulation of silt along with the production of toxic gases from waste dumped in the sewer lines, are repaired. This process is followed to avoid changing the whole sewer line, which can cause inconvenience to the public.

In May last year, the GMDA found around 48 points in the city where sewer lines from the neighbouring residential and commercial establishments were connected to the surface drains illegally. Such illegal connections add to the burden of the pipelines, resulting in faster decay and damage.

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