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Doctors at Delhi hospital remove a giant tumour weighing 4kg from woman’s body

Doctors at Delhi’s Ganga Ram Hospital removed a four-kg cervical tumour as big as a newborn child from a 47-year-old woman after a three-hour surgery. The woman came to the hospital in January this year with complaints of pain in the abdomen and abnormally high bleeding for the past 10 years.

delhi Updated: Aug 24, 2018 08:46 IST
HT Correspondent
Doctors,Ganga Ram Hospital,cervical tumour
Doctors felt a large firm mass almost equivalent to a 34 weeks old pregnancy. (Getty Images/Picture for representation)

Doctors at Delhi’s Ganga Ram Hospital removed a four-kg cervical tumour as big as a newborn child from a 47-year-old woman after a three-hour surgery. The woman came to the hospital in January this year with complaints of pain in the abdomen and abnormally high bleeding for the past 10 years.

Doctors felt a large firm mass almost equivalent to a 34 weeks old pregnancy.

She had earlier got an ultrasound scan of the abdomen done in 2009 that showed a fibroid, non-cancerous tumour in the womb, of 3.3 x 2.3 cm size. But she did not get treated for the condition then.

Investigations at Ganga Ram Hospital revealed the growth had now become a giant tumour of 23cm x 23cm x 16 cm, weighing 4 kgs, and was occupying the space from the depth of the pelvis up to four inches below the breast bone and was adjoining the liver.

The tumour was removed by experts at the minimally invasive gynaecology department.

“It was a unique case in many ways: firstly the huge size, its rapid growth and its management laparoscopically. This case amazed us because in spite of knowing about the tumour, no active management was done to date. Due to its huge size, its precarious position and chances of it being cancerous, its removal was challenging,” said Dr Debasis Dutta, senior consultant, department of minimally invasive gynaecology, Ganga Ram.

Since there was suspicion of the mass being cancerous, the tumour had to be removed in total with minimal blood loss.

“Due to the use of the ‘hybrid technique’, there was no injury to adjoining vital organs such as the bladder, ureter or bowel loops. The estimated blood loss was 500 ml,” said Dr Kanika Chopra.

Another team member, Dr Kanika Jain, said, “The surgery, even though technically challenging, was a success and the patient was discharged on the sixth day after the surgery.”

The case was recently published in ‘Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology Research’.

First Published: Aug 24, 2018 03:44 IST