Female athletes often suffer from eating disorders. A simple estrogen therapy can help them | fitness | Hindustan Times
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Female athletes often suffer from eating disorders. A simple estrogen therapy can help them

Female athletes with exercise-induced menstrual dysfunction (associated with low estrogen levels) often have disordered eating behavior, which may impact their reproductive and bone health

fitness Updated: Mar 18, 2018 16:55 IST
The study found that female athletes with exercise-induced irregular menstrual periods report more disordered eating behaviour than athletes and non-athletes getting regular periods.
The study found that female athletes with exercise-induced irregular menstrual periods report more disordered eating behaviour than athletes and non-athletes getting regular periods. (Shutterstock)

Young female athletes with normal weight and no or irregular menstrual periods reported fewer disordered eating behaviours after receiving estrogen therapy for a year, a recent study has found. “Female athletes with exercise-induced menstrual dysfunction (associated with low estrogen levels) often have disordered eating behavior, which may impact their reproductive and bone health,” said lead researcher Madhusmita Misra of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, Mass.

“Our findings underscore the relationship between estrogen and disordered eating behavior, and the potential of estrogen replacement as a treatment target, not just in athletes, but potentially also in other conditions characterized by abnormal eating behavior and frequent menstrual dysfunction, such as anorexia nervosa,” she said.

Her study found that female athletes with exercise-induced irregular menstrual periods report more disordered eating behaviour than athletes and non-athletes getting regular periods. Misra compared 109 female athletes with exercise-induced menstrual irregularities with 50 female athletes with normal menstrual cycles and 39 female non-athletes. All of the study subjects were 14-25 years old and were in a normal weight range. The young women’s eating behavior and mental health was evaluated with self-report assessments and questionnaires.

Athletes with irregular periods reported a higher drive for thinness and more mental control over their food intake compared with athletes with regular periods and non-athletes. They also had higher mean body dissatisfaction scores than athletes with regular periods.

Athletes who had irregular menstrual periods were randomly assigned to receive either estrogen replacement through a patch, at a dose that resulted in estrogen levels seen with normal menstrual cycles; a commonly used combined oral contraceptive pill containing estrogen; or no estrogen for 12 months. Athletes randomized to estrogen replacement as a patch also received cyclic progesterone.

Over one year, the groups that received estrogen showed reductions in drive for thinness, body dissatisfaction and uncontrolled eating, compared with those who didn’t receive estrogen. The patch was the most effective, leading to significant decreases in body dissatisfaction and uncontrolled eating.