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Home / Gurugram / A haven at the busy state border

A haven at the busy state border

The age of the condominium is reflected in the architecture of the society, in which possession was first given in 1986.

gurgaon Updated: Jun 02, 2019 04:55 IST
Sharanya Munsi
Sharanya Munsi
Hindustan Times, Gurugram
Navigating the crowded NH-8, along which the society lies, is the biggest problem for residents, who have been at a crossroads with the Municipal Corporation of Gurugram (MCG) over encroachment by hawkers.
Navigating the crowded NH-8, along which the society lies, is the biggest problem for residents, who have been at a crossroads with the Municipal Corporation of Gurugram (MCG) over encroachment by hawkers.(HT Photo)

Located at the Delhi-Gurugram border is one of the city’s oldest condominiums, Surya Vihar. Its huge parking lot dotted with amaltas and gulmohar trees in full bloom is the first thing one takes in after stepping into the complex. These colourful blooms stand against the society’s sombre grey walls, painting a scene of a serene setting, in sharp contrast to the bustling activity of vendors, hawkers, cars and a large number of pedestrians outside its boundary wall.

The age of the condominium is reflected in the architecture of the society, in which possession was first given in 1986. The straight balconies of its row houses and apartments hint at art deco, a rare style, amid the city’s flashy glass, plywood and concrete constructions in newer condominiums. The residency has two sets of duplex row houses near the entrance, followed by six towers of nine floors each. The community in Surya Vihar primarily comprises public sector bank employees from across the country.

Navigating the crowded NH-8, along which the society lies, is the biggest problem for residents, who have been at a crossroads with the Municipal Corporation of Gurugram (MCG) over encroachment by hawkers. “This stretch is crowded every hour of the day. Hawkers encroach on the pavement despite police presence. We have nothing against the hawkers, but the authorities should at least create proper stalls for them in a viable location and not choke this road further,” said 73-year-old SP Shukla, a former banker.

The society is flanked by a huge clubhouse, which is now gathering dust as the gym was shut years ago due to mismanagement. A large swimming pool in the lawn attached to the building is also lying in disuse due to lack of water. “The RWA is yet to receive the clubhouse from the builder. Once we do, hopefully soon, we are going to revamp it,” said RWA president Sonu Yadav.

An indoor badminton court, complete with artificial green grass, was added last month.

Residents of the society raised the issue of a dumpster, adjoining their society, which they are concerned will pose health problems. “The smell and smoke from the dump is almost always present. It is an absolute health hazard. There are many children living here,” said Namrata Sharma, as two toddlers were rolled away in their strollers.

One set of the row houses and two towers are yet to receive occupancy certificate, which is why the RWA is yet to takeover the upkeep. The residents, however, have formed a strong bond. “In winter, we hold three or four potlucks. Every family brings a special item from their kitchen and shares it with everyone. Last year, we had a paratha-only potluck lunch,” said Deepit Tripathi, a 43-year-old homemaker.

Surya Vihar holds testimony to the city’s evolution from being a village that saw an automobile company open its first factory in the early 1980s to its current day status as a megapolis.

ht epaper

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