Municipal Corporation of Gurugram elections:Bereft of amenities, Ward 35 has endless civic issues | gurgaon | Hindustan Times
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Municipal Corporation of Gurugram elections:Bereft of amenities, Ward 35 has endless civic issues

Officials said that Ward 35 is the only ward in the city whose arterial roads end at the tip of the Delhi-Gurgaon expressway at one end and Mehrauli-Gurgaon Road on the other. However, that has done very little to bring relief to the residents here.

gurgaon Updated: Sep 12, 2017 23:52 IST
Kartik Kumar
Around 88 people had filed their nominations till Tuesday for the upcoming Municipal Corporation of Gurugram polls.
Around 88 people had filed their nominations till Tuesday for the upcoming Municipal Corporation of Gurugram polls.(HT)

Ward 35 of Gurgaon is surrounded by Delhi on three sides. Yet, despite so close to the National Capital, the ward lacks even the basic of civic amenities.

Officials said that Ward 35 is the only ward in the city whose arterial roads end at the tip of the Delhi-Gurgaon expressway at one end and Mehrauli-Gurgaon Road on the other.

However, that has done very little to bring relief to the residents here.

Its roads here are damaged, sewer connection blocked, illegal construction plenty and water supply scarce.

Amid these deficiencies, the expansion of Metro connectivity in the area, the mushrooming of offices at nearby Cyber City and a road leading to a popular mall often ensures that traffic is thrown out of gear.

Those who settled in the area in the early 2000s recollect that the situation ‘wasn’t this barbaric’ then. They remember being able to see their house from the Mehrauli-Gurgaon border when area had huge open spaces instead of the houses being virtually attached to each other.

“My society was ensconced in a quiet corner overlooking a forested area. Water and electricity supply was plenty, and the plots were well spread out. Soon, MNCs started basing their offices in Cyber City and the area became an attraction for the working class. Once urbanization hit, illegal houses sprang up like mushroom, the supply-demand ration of amenities took a hit and things have never been the same again,” Nitin Kumar, a resident of pink town houses in DLF Phase 3 said.

The DLF Phase 3 colony is one of the nine localities whose maintenance is due to be transferred from private colony to the Municipal Corporation of Gurugram (MCG). This issue has prompted residents from deciding not to vote during the upcoming elections.

“The MCG was to take over the maintenance of the colony last year, but they never did. Even at present, it seems they aren’t going to take over the maintenance. How can we vote in the civic elections, when the civic body itself has failed us?” Karan Sharma, a resident of white town houses in DLF Phase 3, said.

Many residents also voiced their concerns regarding MCG’s failure to execute fumigation activities properly.

“Despite numerous letters, emails and personal visits to MCG officials about mosquito breeding spots in the locality, no action has been taken. After that some residents tested positive for dengue and chikungunya. We hope that the new councilor addresses our issues, which the civic officials have failed to,” said Anil Johri, a resident of U-block, DLF Phase 3.

The rural parts of the ward also have their issues with the MCG. In the past they have had numerous run-ins with the civic officials that have turned violent. For them, the elections holds importance as they want to choose a councilor that can be a representative of their interests in the civic body.

“Two people from the village were arrested by the police for clashing with MCG officials, after the civic officials tried to take away their cattle claiming them to be stray animals. Don’t they understand that the animals are their bread and butter and help them provide for the family?” Navin Yadav, a resident of Nathupur said.