New Delhi -°C
Today in New Delhi, India

Nov 20, 2019-Wednesday
-°C

Humidity
-

Wind
-

Select city

Metro cities - Delhi, Mumbai, Chennai, Kolkata

Other cities - Noida, Gurgaon, Bengaluru, Hyderabad, Bhopal , Chandigarh , Dehradun, Indore, Jaipur, Lucknow, Patna, Ranchi

Thursday, Nov 21, 2019

Gurugramwale: Recycle folder… in the real world

A landmark for the print edition aficionados

gurugram Updated: Aug 27, 2019 14:10 IST
Mayank Austen Soofi
Mayank Austen Soofi
Hindustan Times
Gaurav’s shop in Jacobpura,  Gurugram stocks thousands of newspapers on its shelves before these are sold to paper-recycling plants.
Gaurav’s shop in Jacobpura, Gurugram stocks thousands of newspapers on its shelves before these are sold to paper-recycling plants. (HT Photo )
         

Dear reader, one wonders where you might be seated while reading this newspaper. Perhaps you are at your dining table, taking in the headlines over morning chai and daliya.

Or maybe you are, as they say, “sitting on the commode”.

Whatever, you are surely not the final destination of this newspaper that was printed last night for you.

In fact, one of the final stages in a newspaper’s life tends to be a place seemingly as ordinary as this—Gaurav ki Shop in Gurugram. The little kiosk in Jacobpura stocks thousands of newspapers on its shelves. “We buy old newspapers from the kabadi wallas, who collect them from private houses, and we later sell these to paper-recycling plants,” says owner Gaurav Chatkara.

In an age where so many of us are getting our news and opinions from websites, this shop is a sight to behold.

Newsprint littered everywhere; the dailies stacked up to the ceiling.

Some of these bundles are days-old for sure but the newspapers in them are still crisp and untouched. “These were given away by dealers when they fail to sell their stock… it happens all the time,” says Mr Chatkara.

The young gentleman collects almost five tonnes of newspapers every week.

“A truck comes after every seven days to carry the stacks to recycling mills in Punjab.” He says that there used to be a similar mill in Gurugram, but it shut down a month ago. Looking about the shop, Mr Chatkara says, “I’m a graduate. I don’t need to do these things. But I opted for this work not just for a living but also to do my bit in saving the planet.”

Unlike in the Western countries, newspapers in print are still thriving in India. Places like Gaurav ki Shop will probably remain economically viable for a long time to come. Even so, try stopping by this landmark to get a sense of what happens to the newspaper you are currently holding in your hands. A must-visit for print media aficionados, the shop is situated on Kabir Bhawan Road and is open daily from 8am to 2pm.