Weekend Binge: Predicting the Golden Globes - who will win and who should win | Hindustan Times
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Weekend Binge: Predicting the Golden Globes - who will win and who should win

From Meryl Streep and James Franco to Christopher Nolan and Steven Spielberg, let’s have some fun picking the winners for Monday’s 75th Golden Globe Awards.

weekend binge Updated: Jan 06, 2018 09:00 IST
James Franco as Tommy Wiseau in the Disaster Artist and Fionn Whitehead in Dunkirk.
James Franco as Tommy Wiseau in the Disaster Artist and Fionn Whitehead in Dunkirk.

Every week, we will curate a collection of titles - movies, TV, general miscellanea - for you to watch (and in some cases, read, or listen to), in a series we call Weekend Binge. The selection will be based on a theme which binds the picks - which could be extremely blunt in certain instances, or confusingly abstract in some. No rules apply, other than the end goal being getting some great entertainment to watch.

While the idea is to base the theme on the week’s major events - it could be the release of a new movie, or show - we could also use this opportunity to comment on our world in general, and turn to art to wrap our heads around some of the more difficult stories of the past seven days.

With just two days to go to the annual Golden Globes, which are -- and this should be made very clear right up front -- a complete joke, let’s not waste an opportunity to take wild stabs at guessing the winners. Unlike most years though, the Globes made some relatively safe nominations this time around - remember, this is the same award show that decided to honour Johnny Depp and Angelina Jolie’s The Tourist presumably because they’d promised to show up.

But luckily for us all, we won’t be forced to declare that Daddy’s Home 2 doesn’t stand a chance in the Best Supporting Actor category, because despite being the Globes, they didn’t nominate Mel Gibson (this year).

So here’s who we think will win, and most importantly, should win in 9 major categories.

Best Motion Picture - Drama

This image released by Fox Searchlight shows Frances McDormand in a scene from Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri. (AP)

While it’s likely that Steven Spielberg’s very timely The Post or Guillermo del Toro’s The Shape of Water end up winning the biggest Globe of the year, the film that should take the trophy is Martin McDonagh’s Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri. It features some of McDonagh’s most incensed writing, his incredible talent for creating profound profanity, and a Frances McDormand performance that’s right up there with Marge Gunderson from Fargo. Three Billboards... is about everything from government corruption, racism, sexual assault, domestic violence, police brutality, suicide and feminism. You’d be surprised to learn that it’s among the funniest movies of the year.

Best Motion Picture - Musical or Comedy

This image released by Universal Pictures shows Daniel Kaluuya in a scene from, Get Out. (AP)

Now that the Globes have nominated the horror movie Get Out in this category - previous nominees include The Martian and Birdman, neither of which were either musicals or comedies - they might as well give it the award too. However, The Disaster Artist and I, Tonya would be just as deserving, simply for featuring two of the brightest comedic performances of 2017 - two performances that humanised individuals who had, for decades, been ridiculed by the media.

Best Actor/Actress - Drama

This image released by Sony Pictures Classics shows Timothée Chalamet in a scene from Call Me By Your Name. (AP)

There is no way that Daniel Day Lewis isn’t winning this one, what with Phantom Thread being his much publicised final film and all, but imagine a world in which the tremendous Timothée Chalamet takes home the award. His performance in Call Me By Your Name made him a movie star, no question. Similarly, it’s practically written in stone that Meryl Streep must win every Golden Globe ever, but honouring Frances McDormand’s instantly iconic performance would go a long way, because in another world, McDormand could easily be considered on par with Streep.

This image released by Fox Searchlight shows Frances McDormand in a scene from Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri. (AP)

Best Actor/Actress - Musical or Comedy

This image released by A24 shows James Franco in a scene from The Disaster Artist. (AP)

This one’s easy, and perhaps even the only category in which there will not be much dispute. James Franco as Tommy Wiseau in The Disaster Artist and Margot Robbie as Tonya Harding in I, Tonya - both performances for the ages, and both performances that removed years of stigma attached to their respective subjects.

This image released by Neon shows Margot Robbie as Tonya Harding in a scene from I, Tonya. (AP)

Best Supporting Actor/Actress

This image released by Neon shows Allison Janney as LaVona Golden from I, Tonya. (AP)

Allison Janney should win, and will win for her hard-as-nails performance as Tonya Harding’s brutally unlikeable mother in I, Tonya. But the Best Supporting Actor category is the toughest one of the year. Armie Hammer (Call Me By Your Name), Willem Dafoe (The Florida Project) and Sam Rockwell (Three Billboards...) are equally deserving contenders - but there’s something about the political and cultural climate that we live in that would make Dafoe’s victory a rather sweet one. In Sean Baker’s exquisite The Florida Project, Dafoe’s character, Bobby, is basically the only symbol (and reminder) of human decency in a tragic, unforgiving world.

This image released by A24 shows Willem Dafoe in a scene from The Florida Project. (AP)

Best Director

This image released by Warner Bros. Pictures shows director Christopher Nolan, left, on the set of Dunkirk with actor Kenneth Branagh. (AP)

Yes, Ridley Scott pulled off an incredible feat with All the Money in the World, and yes, luminaries such as Steven Spielberg and Guillermo del Toro are in contention, but it’s Christopher Nolan’s year, wouldn’t you say? What he did with Dunkirk was pure filmmaking - a symphonic blast of sight and sound in one of the year’s most humanistic films.

Follow @htshowbiz for more
The author tweets @RohanNaahar

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