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Chandrayaan-2 launch on July 22, says ISRO; days after first attempt was called off due to technical snag

The Chandrayaan 2 will be the first ever mission in the world to explore the South Pole of the moon.

india Updated: Jul 18, 2019 18:35 IST
HT Correspondent
HT Correspondent
New Delhi
Chandrayaan-2 launch, which was called off due to a technical snag on July 15, 2019, is now rescheduled at 2:43 pm IST on Monday, July 22, 2019.
Chandrayaan-2 launch, which was called off due to a technical snag on July 15, 2019, is now rescheduled at 2:43 pm IST on Monday, July 22, 2019.(PTI Photo)
         

India’s second mission to the moon Chandrayaan 2 will be launched on July 22, seven days after the first take off had to be called off with 56 minutes to go due to a technical glitch, the Indian Space Research Organisation announced on Thursday.

“Chandrayaan-2 launch, which was called off due to a technical snag on July 15, 2019, is now rescheduled at 2:43 pm IST on Monday, July 22, 2019,” the Isro tweeted.

The Chandrayaan 2 will be the first ever mission in the world to explore the South Pole of the moon. The South Pole is where researchers think water ice on the lunar surface can be directly observed, evidence for which was gathered by spectrometers aboard India’s previous moon mission launched in 2008.

WATCH | ISRO to launch Chandrayaan 2 on July 22

The mission was first scheduled for March 2018, and was then delayed four times for making design changes and correcting deviations.

“The July 15 launch had to be called off due to a helium leak after a nipple joint valve in the plumbing malfunctioned,” an ex-scientist at the Isro had told HT on condition of anonymity.

Helium is used in cryogenic engines that use oxygen and hydrogen as fuel, such as the Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV) Mark III that will carry Chandrayaan-2, in pressuring the propellant tank to keep it from collapsing and to prevent the formation of bubbles.

Helium is the only gas that can be used as its normal boiling point is lower than that of hydrogen; any other gas would freeze, producing particles that could clog the propulsion system, a scientist said.

First Published: Jul 18, 2019 11:18 IST

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