IIT to play Sarod on synthesizer! | india | Hindustan Times
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IIT to play Sarod on synthesizer!

SAROD, VEENA and many more Indian musical instruments will soon get key positions on the synthesiser with 100 per cent classical accuracy, says IIT Kanpur director Sanjay G Dhande.

india Updated: Jan 10, 2006 00:33 IST

SAROD, VEENA and many more Indian musical instruments will soon get key positions on the synthesiser with 100 per cent classical accuracy, says IIT Kanpur director Sanjay G Dhande.

IIT experts have had brief sessions with musical maestros to get the note-to-note classical accuracy in digitised form, he says. “I myself met Sarod Player Amzad Ali Khan just 15 days ago in this regard,” he says and adds, “some Indian musical instruments have already been on the synthesizer, but note-to-note accuracy is what IIT is striving for.

“Now that western musical instruments have been digitalised, the same can be achieved in terms of the Indian classical instruments. Once that happens, music buffs would get to hear high quality of old Indian musical notes — thanks largely to the advanced digitalisation process that has come into practice with the advancement of technology,” he added.

The exercise to digitalise the Indian musical instruments has already got under way and Kanpur IIT has digitalised 200 ragas and raginis.

“We’re in the process of refining them. And once we’re satisfied with the quality, we would seek consultation from music exponents and then go on to popularise it,” says A Chatterjee, faculty member in the Mechanical Engineering Department, Kanpur IIT, while talking to HT on Monday.

Researchers and experts from premier institutes like IITs, IIITs and that of ITC Sangeet Research Academy (ITCSRA), Kolkata, have come to in the state capital to participate at the international symposium on Frontiers of Research on Speech and Music (FSRM 2006) organised by ITCSRA in collaboration with UP Technical University.

Another professor of Indian Institute of Information Technology (IIIT), Jabalpur stated that they were working in the direction of standardization of musical notes being produced from Indian instruments. This would help in maintaining the same quality of the music.

“Those having an ear for music would know that the sound produced from sitar or tabla gets changed after it is played for a while. In case of tabla the leather gets softer while in the case of sitar the string gets loose. This alters the sound produced from the instruments,” said Dr Puneet Tandon of Jabalpur.

Prof AK Datta of ITCSRA explained that the aim of this symposium was to highlight the current status and trends of research and applications in the area of speech and music. Another objective of this symposium was to encourage researchers in the field of basic sciences like physics, mathematics, etc to find way to improve our indigenous music.