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No respite from potholes in Mumbai this monsoon too?

In a first, the civic body is manufacturing a mixture in-house from ingredients imported from Germany, which will be used to fix potholes on a trial basis. Depending on the success, it may be used to resurface entire roads.

mumbai Updated: Apr 11, 2018 10:33 IST
Eeshanpriya M S
Eeshanpriya M S
Hindustan Times
Mumbai,monsoon,potholes
Earlier, the civic body had imported pothole-fixing mixtures from Israel and Austria, but they proved to be unsuccessful in preventing potholes(FILE)

The Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) plans to use the trial-and-error method to ensure no potholes appear on Mumbai’s roads this monsoon.

In a first, the civic body is manufacturing a mixture in-house from ingredients imported from Germany, which will be used to fix potholes on a trial basis. Depending on the success, it may be used to resurface entire roads.

An official from the roads department said, “We have imported material to make around 10 tonnes of mixture. But this is only a sample. It is an additive that will be mixed with asphalt to fill up potholes. If successful, we will order 2,500 metric tonnes of the material, which will then be used to maintain and resurface roads.”

The whole order, if placed, will cost Rs127 crore.

Experts, however, are sceptical. Nikhil Desai from NGO AGNI (Action for Good governance and Networking in India), said, “There is no point fixing potholes during a dry spell of the monsoon. If the pothole is even slightly wet, the mixture will not stick. If BMC really wants to tackle potholes, it should start fixing them between April and June. They should have tested the sample earlier.”

DM Sukthankar, chief secretary of the state government who also represents NGO AGNI, said, “Mumbai’s weather is very different from across the world. Any mixture that has worked elsewhere is unlikely to work in Mumbai. Using trial-and-error is a welcome move, but it may not reduce the number of potholes this year.”

Earlier, the civic body had imported pothole-fixing mixtures from Israel and Austria, but they proved to be unsuccessful in preventing potholes. While the new mixture will contain the same ingredients, it will be manufactured in-house at BMC’s Worli plant. The official said, “The only difference is the cost. This will cost BMC Rs28 for a kg, compared to the Rs170 for a kg we paid for the mixture from Israel. Also, as we will make this mixture in-house, we will cut cost there.”

First Published: Apr 11, 2018 10:33 IST