Snack and the city: Misal pav festivals a massive hit in Mumbai | mumbai news | Hindustan Times
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Snack and the city: Misal pav festivals a massive hit in Mumbai

Mumbai politicians are inviting well-known brands from across Maharashtra to participate in such fests

mumbai Updated: Jan 27, 2018 22:36 IST
Naresh Kamath
Naresh Kamath
Hindustan Times
Misal pav,Maharashtrian snack,farsan
Misal is a popular Maharashtrian snacks comprising sprouts, moth beans, farsan, tomatoes, onions, boiled potatoes, lemon and coriander.(HT File Photo)

After Koli and Malvani food festivals, those centred around Misal pav seem to be catching on in Mumbai.

Misal is a popular Maharashtrian snack comprising sprouts, moth beans, farsan, tomatoes, onions, boiled potatoes, lemon and coriander. A plate ranges from Rs40 to Rs70.

The first Misal pav festival was organised at Vile Parle in December. It was a massive hit, with serpentine queues of patrons. Cyrus Ghaswalla ,who stood in line for half-an-hour, returned without tasting the dishes. “It would have taken me at least two hours to get inside. It was chaotic as the organisers had not anticipated such a huge turnout,” he said.

Now, politicians are inviting well-known brands from across the state to participate in such fests. “People are tired of Malvani and Koli festivals. Misal pav events are now a novelty,” said state minister and Shiv Sena leader Ravindra Waikar, who organised a two-day festival at his Jogeshwari constituency. “The response was so great, 14,000 people attended on the first day.”

The Maharashtra Navnirman Sena’s (MNS) ‘Misal Mahatsova’ festival at Mahim began on January 26 and will continue till January 28. As many as 20 stalls are serving up 40 flavours of Misal. MNS leader Nitin Sardesai said popular brands such as Mamledar from Thane, Aaswad from Mumbai, Mule Misal from Sangmeshwar, Marutirao from Ahmednagar and Wadeshwar from Pune set up stalls at the fest.

Politicians said such festivals help them connect with the masses. “It is part of symbolic politics and helps to form a connect with voters. It is an image building exercise and soft political propaganda,” said political analyst Surendra Jondhale.

First Published: Jan 27, 2018 22:36 IST