Boy sodomised: Let your child open up to you, say child experts to parents | Hindustan Times
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Boy sodomised: Let your child open up to you, say child experts to parents

Noida-based child experts believe that a sensitive approach towards children is needed so that a victim can approach their parents or school authorities at the earliest.

noida Updated: Oct 27, 2017 21:18 IST
Vaibhav Jha

In the light of the recent incident of a child being sodomised at a private school in Greater Noida, city-based child experts, counsellors and psychologists believe that due diligence, sensitivity and a friendly approach towards children is needed to bring such instances in the open.

On Tuesday, the police arrested a 35-year-old man for allegedly sodomising an 11-year-old foreign national student in the school premises. The accused was an administrative staff of the school who, according to the victim; had been sexually abusing him for the last four years. The victim’s mother said that her son was also a victim of racial abuse.

Noida-based child experts believe that a sensitive approach towards children is needed so that a victim can approach their parents or school authorities at the earliest.

“The support system is crucial for any child to fall back upon, whenever needed. Children should feel free to talk to their parents about the happenings in their school without any fear or hesitation,” said Rajeswari Thyagarajan, a women’s rights and child rights activist and vice-president, Society for Sports and Cultural Advancement.

“Often children are not aware of the ‘right’ and ‘wrong’ touch and this ignorance help the perpetrators in continuing their abuse. Once I showed an educational video to girl students in Nithari village, after which many approached me saying that they were not aware of these facts,” said Thyagarajan.

Another child safety expert, Satya Prakash, programme manager of FXB India Suraksha, says that victims in such cases are usually under extreme pressure. “We are following this case closely and it has come to our notice that the accused used to threaten the victim of dire consequences if he tried to reveal the ordeal to his parents. The child was already under extreme pressure and this helped the perpetrator,” said Prakash.

He further says that sex education by both schools and parents are needed for the child to have enough courage to speak up. “Parents must tell their children about the bad touches and what one can do to raise the alarm. Sex education must also be taught compulsorily. The child was also being discriminated by his classmates and this is another issue that needs to be probed,” said Prakash.

Dr Mrinmay Das, senior consultant, psychiatrist of Jaypee Hospital said that if sexual abuse cases are not confronted in the beginning, it often leads to depression and suicidal tendencies among victims at later stages of their lives. “It is extremely important for parents to confront such abuse at the earliest. Often, we have seen that the victims find it difficult to maintain healthy relationships when they grow up. This leads to depression and often, suicidal tendencies are found,” said Dr Das.

Niti Srivastava, a parent, believes that school must include parents in their working committees so that the school management can be updated about the happenings.

“Such an incident took place because no extra care was taken by the school towards children safety. I believe parents must also be a part of the school management committee so that we can give inputs regarding safety measures and raise the alarm whenever necessary,” said Srivastava.

Dr RK Srivastava, senior consultant and psychiatrist, department of Mental Health and Behavioural Sciences in Fortis Noida, says there is enough evidence shown by a child in case of extreme physical abuse.

“A child suffers anxiety and mental trauma if such an abuse is happening on regular basis. Parents can keep a watch and catch these symptoms of their child. His/her academic performance also goes on a decline and in such cases, parents should approach their children with care to know the real reasons,” said Dr Srivastava.

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