Photos: Farmers march towards Delhi in protest against reform laws

UPDATED ON NOV 26, 2020 06:01 PM IST
Members of various farmers organizations try to cross Shambu Border during the “Delhi Chalo” protest march in Patiala on November 26. Haryana Police fired tear gas and used water cannons to stop farmers from Punjab marching to New Delhi to protest the Centre’s agricultural reforms. The confrontation occurred when police tried to stop the farmers from crossing a bridge about 200 kilometres from Delhi. (PTI)
Farmers block a police vehicle during their march to New Delhi, in Ambala on November 26. Police officials at the Shambhu inter-state border had at first used loud speakers, asking farmers who had assembled on the Punjab side to disperse when some of them tried to cross and remove the barricades, PTI reported. (AFP)
Enhanced security at Singhu border in New Delhi on November 26. Anticipating the protest’s arrival, the Delhi Police has also strengthened its presence in border areas of the national capital. At the Singhu border, trucks filled with sand have been stationed to stop movement of tractors being driven by farmers. (Arun Sharma / PTI)
Farmers remove a police barrier blocking a road during their protest march to New Delhi on the outskirts of Ambala on November 26. The situation remained tense at the Shambu inter-state border as protesting farmers threw police barricades into the Ghaggar river.Some protestors were also seen waving black flags. (AFP)
The Haryana Police eventually used water cannons to disperse the farmers, who had gathered in large numbers in tractor-trolleys, when they started removing the concrete barricades. But when that did not deter the farmers, they used tear gas. While it delayed the crossing over, farmers were determined and have continued their march to Delhi. (Bharat Bhushan / HT Photo)
Tear gas is fired by the police to disperse and impede farmers in Ambala on November 26. Farmers have given a call for the march to coincide with the Constitution Day. While the government says the three reform laws will do away with middlemen, enabling farmers to sell their produce in the commercial markets, protestors fear that this could lead to disruptions of existing structures and exploitation by corporate buyers. (AFP)
People walk past police personnel at Delhi-Ghaziabad border in Ghazipur, New Delhi on November 26. The farmers are scheduled to reach Delhi through five highways connecting the city. Deputy commissioner of police and Delhi Police spokesperson Eish Singhal has said that so far the situation is normal and police forces along with anti-riot force and paramilitary personnel are deployed adequately at all border areas, HT reported. (Vijay Verma / PTI)
Police deployment and barricading in place at Delhi-Gurugram border in light of the farmers’ march, in Gurugram on November 26. Haryana authorities have also imposed prohibitory orders under Section 144 in several parts of the state to prevent assembly of protesters. (Parveen Kumar / HT Photo)
Farmers break past police barricades while marching towards Delhi, at Ambala on November 25. The march picked up steam on November 25, when multi-layer barricades on Punjab’s borders with Haryana were demolished by farmers using tractors as they continued their march towards the capital. (HT Photo)

Members of various farmers organizations try to cross Shambu Border during the “Delhi Chalo” protest march in Patiala on November 26. Haryana Police fired tear gas and used water cannons to stop farmers from Punjab marching to New Delhi to protest the Centre’s agricultural reforms. The confrontation occurred when police tried to stop the farmers from crossing a bridge about 200 kilometres from Delhi. (PTI)

Farmers block a police vehicle during their march to New Delhi, in Ambala on November 26. Police officials at the Shambhu inter-state border had at first used loud speakers, asking farmers who had assembled on the Punjab side to disperse when some of them tried to cross and remove the barricades, PTI reported. (AFP)

Enhanced security at Singhu border in New Delhi on November 26. Anticipating the protest’s arrival, the Delhi Police has also strengthened its presence in border areas of the national capital. At the Singhu border, trucks filled with sand have been stationed to stop movement of tractors being driven by farmers. (Arun Sharma / PTI)

Farmers remove a police barrier blocking a road during their protest march to New Delhi on the outskirts of Ambala on November 26. The situation remained tense at the Shambu inter-state border as protesting farmers threw police barricades into the Ghaggar river.Some protestors were also seen waving black flags. (AFP)

The Haryana Police eventually used water cannons to disperse the farmers, who had gathered in large numbers in tractor-trolleys, when they started removing the concrete barricades. But when that did not deter the farmers, they used tear gas. While it delayed the crossing over, farmers were determined and have continued their march to Delhi. (Bharat Bhushan / HT Photo)

Tear gas is fired by the police to disperse and impede farmers in Ambala on November 26. Farmers have given a call for the march to coincide with the Constitution Day. While the government says the three reform laws will do away with middlemen, enabling farmers to sell their produce in the commercial markets, protestors fear that this could lead to disruptions of existing structures and exploitation by corporate buyers. (AFP)

People walk past police personnel at Delhi-Ghaziabad border in Ghazipur, New Delhi on November 26. The farmers are scheduled to reach Delhi through five highways connecting the city. Deputy commissioner of police and Delhi Police spokesperson Eish Singhal has said that so far the situation is normal and police forces along with anti-riot force and paramilitary personnel are deployed adequately at all border areas, HT reported. (Vijay Verma / PTI)

Police deployment and barricading in place at Delhi-Gurugram border in light of the farmers’ march, in Gurugram on November 26. Haryana authorities have also imposed prohibitory orders under Section 144 in several parts of the state to prevent assembly of protesters. (Parveen Kumar / HT Photo)

Farmers break past police barricades while marching towards Delhi, at Ambala on November 25. The march picked up steam on November 25, when multi-layer barricades on Punjab’s borders with Haryana were demolished by farmers using tractors as they continued their march towards the capital. (HT Photo)

About The Gallery

Thousands of farmers have been marching to Delhi from Punjab and Haryana protesting against the recent reform laws that were passed with the intent to liberalise the agriculture sector. While some groups were stopped in Haryana on November 25 and water cannons used against them, several others continue to approach Delhi to stage a protest. Farmers have expressed apprehension that the new laws would pave way for the dismantling of the minimum support price system, leaving them at the "mercy" of big corporates. They have been demanding that the laws be repealed.

[OTHER GALLERIES]

SHARE
Story Saved