Photos: NASA's Perseverance Rover sends back panoramic view of landing site

  • NASA's Mars 2020 Perseverance rover sent back its first high-definition view of its new home on Mars’ Jezero Crater on February 21, after rotating its mast, or "head," 360 degrees, allowing the rover's Mastcam-Z instrument to capture its first panorama since touching down on the Red Planet. In what was the rover's second panorama ever –the rover's Navigation Cameras captured a 360-degree view– the mission beamed back a Martian surface that appears similar to images captured by previous NASA rover missions.
PUBLISHED ON FEB 26, 2021 04:48 PM IST 8 Photos
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A portion of a panorama made up of individual images taken by the Navigation Cameras, or Navcams, aboard NASA’s Perseverance Mars rover shows the Martian landscape on February 20.(NASA / JPL-Caltech via REUTERS)

A portion of a panorama made up of individual images taken by the Navigation Cameras, or Navcams, aboard NASA’s Perseverance Mars rover shows the Martian landscape on February 20.(NASA / JPL-Caltech via REUTERS)

PUBLISHED ON FEB 26, 2021 04:48 PM IST
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The rim of Jezero Crater seen in the first 360-degree panorama taken by the Mastcam-Z instrument aboard NASA’s Perseverance Mars rover on February 21. The panorama was stitched together on Earth from 142 individual images taken on Sol 3, the third Martian day of the mission.(NASA / JPL-Caltech / ASU / MSSS)

The rim of Jezero Crater seen in the first 360-degree panorama taken by the Mastcam-Z instrument aboard NASA’s Perseverance Mars rover on February 21. The panorama was stitched together on Earth from 142 individual images taken on Sol 3, the third Martian day of the mission.(NASA / JPL-Caltech / ASU / MSSS)

PUBLISHED ON FEB 26, 2021 04:48 PM IST
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A diagram added over the parachute deployed during the descent of the Mars Perseverance rover as it approached the Martian surface on February 18. Systems engineer Ian Clark used a binary code to spell out “Dare Mighty Things” in the orange and white strips of the 70-foot (21-meter) parachute. He also included the GPS coordinates for the mission's headquarters at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.(NASA / JPL-Caltech via AP)

A diagram added over the parachute deployed during the descent of the Mars Perseverance rover as it approached the Martian surface on February 18. Systems engineer Ian Clark used a binary code to spell out “Dare Mighty Things” in the orange and white strips of the 70-foot (21-meter) parachute. He also included the GPS coordinates for the mission's headquarters at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.(NASA / JPL-Caltech via AP)

PUBLISHED ON FEB 26, 2021 04:48 PM IST
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A high-resolution still image from a video taken by several cameras as NASA’s Perseverance rover touched down on Mars. A key objective of Perseverance's mission on Mars is astrobiology, including the search for signs of ancient microbial life.(NASA / JPL-Caltech)

A high-resolution still image from a video taken by several cameras as NASA’s Perseverance rover touched down on Mars. A key objective of Perseverance's mission on Mars is astrobiology, including the search for signs of ancient microbial life.(NASA / JPL-Caltech)

PUBLISHED ON FEB 26, 2021 04:48 PM IST
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This image shows with a green dot where NASA’s Perseverance rover landed in Jezero Crater on Mars on February 18. The Perseverance rover will characterize the planet's geology and past climate, pave the way for human exploration of the Red Planet, and be the first mission to collect and cache Martian rock and regolith (broken rock and dust).(NASA / JPL-Caltech/ University of Arizona)

This image shows with a green dot where NASA’s Perseverance rover landed in Jezero Crater on Mars on February 18. The Perseverance rover will characterize the planet's geology and past climate, pave the way for human exploration of the Red Planet, and be the first mission to collect and cache Martian rock and regolith (broken rock and dust).(NASA / JPL-Caltech/ University of Arizona)

PUBLISHED ON FEB 26, 2021 04:48 PM IST
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This is the first high-resolution, color image to be sent back by the Hazard Cameras (Hazcams) on the underside of NASA’s Perseverance Mars rover after its landing on February 18. Subsequent NASA missions, in cooperation with ESA (European Space Agency), will send spacecraft to Mars to collect these sealed samples from the surface and return them to Earth for in-depth analysis.(NASA / JPL-Caltech)

This is the first high-resolution, color image to be sent back by the Hazard Cameras (Hazcams) on the underside of NASA’s Perseverance Mars rover after its landing on February 18. Subsequent NASA missions, in cooperation with ESA (European Space Agency), will send spacecraft to Mars to collect these sealed samples from the surface and return them to Earth for in-depth analysis.(NASA / JPL-Caltech)

PUBLISHED ON FEB 26, 2021 04:48 PM IST
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The surface of Mars directly below NASA's Mars Perseverance rover is seen using the Rover Down-Look Camera in an image acquired on February 22.(NASA / JPL-Caltech via REUTERS)

The surface of Mars directly below NASA's Mars Perseverance rover is seen using the Rover Down-Look Camera in an image acquired on February 22.(NASA / JPL-Caltech via REUTERS)

PUBLISHED ON FEB 26, 2021 04:48 PM IST
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A NASA image released on February 24 shows the Perseverance rover at its new home, on the Jezero Crater. The Mars 2020 Perseverance mission is part of NASA's Moon to Mars exploration approach, which includes Artemis missions to the Moon that will help prepare for human exploration of the Red Planet.( NASA / JPL-CALTECH via AFP)

A NASA image released on February 24 shows the Perseverance rover at its new home, on the Jezero Crater. The Mars 2020 Perseverance mission is part of NASA's Moon to Mars exploration approach, which includes Artemis missions to the Moon that will help prepare for human exploration of the Red Planet.( NASA / JPL-CALTECH via AFP)

PUBLISHED ON FEB 26, 2021 04:48 PM IST
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