Photos: Upgraded GMRT in Pune opens up space for path-breaking discoveries

The world’s largest low-frequency radio telescope, Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) located at Narayangaon, around 80km from Pune, has been in operation in the international arena for over a decade now, and is used by astronomers from all over the world, with more than 50 per cent of users coming from outside India. Its upgradation work, which began in 2014, was completed in 2019. The upgrade will help provide missing answers to the history of the universe as the new capabilities would grant GMRT access to a plethora of space imagery.

UPDATED ON FEB 03, 2020 11:09 AM IST 7 Photos
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The upgradation work of the world’s largest low-frequency radio telescope, Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) located at Narayangaon around 80km from Pune, is now complete. The work which began in 2014 and completed in 2019, will help provide missing answers to the history of the universe as the new capabilities would grant GMRT access to a plethora of space imagery. (Sanket Wankhade / HT Photo)

The upgradation work of the world’s largest low-frequency radio telescope, Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) located at Narayangaon around 80km from Pune, is now complete. The work which began in 2014 and completed in 2019, will help provide missing answers to the history of the universe as the new capabilities would grant GMRT access to a plethora of space imagery. (Sanket Wankhade / HT Photo)

UPDATED ON FEB 03, 2020 11:09 AM IST
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The GMRT is built and operated by the National Centre for Radio Astrophysics (NCRA)-Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR). The telescope has been in operation in the international arena for over a decade now, and is used by astronomers from all over the world, with more than 50 per cent of users coming from outside India. (Sanket Wankhade / HT Photo)

The GMRT is built and operated by the National Centre for Radio Astrophysics (NCRA)-Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR). The telescope has been in operation in the international arena for over a decade now, and is used by astronomers from all over the world, with more than 50 per cent of users coming from outside India. (Sanket Wankhade / HT Photo)

UPDATED ON FEB 03, 2020 11:09 AM IST
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Explaining the technicalities of the upgrade, Yashwant Gupta, centre director, NCRA, said, “We have modified the entire receiver system, the electronics and hardware that process data and the corresponding software which handles a higher volume of data. The new upgrades will allow exploring a wider range of frequencies. With the upgraded GMRT, it is possible to adjust the configuration to look at any desired frequency in the range of 100 megahertz to 1,500 megahertz.” (Sanket Wankhade / HT Photo)

Explaining the technicalities of the upgrade, Yashwant Gupta, centre director, NCRA, said, “We have modified the entire receiver system, the electronics and hardware that process data and the corresponding software which handles a higher volume of data. The new upgrades will allow exploring a wider range of frequencies. With the upgraded GMRT, it is possible to adjust the configuration to look at any desired frequency in the range of 100 megahertz to 1,500 megahertz.” (Sanket Wankhade / HT Photo)

UPDATED ON FEB 03, 2020 11:09 AM IST
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The control centre of GMRT. “In order to work on a higher frequency, we needed a major technological change. Earlier, our receiver could extract only 32 megahertz, however, with the new technology in place, it can now extract a maximum of 400 megahertz. This increase in capability is due to the upgradation,” Gupta further added. (Sanket Wankhade / HT Photo)

The control centre of GMRT. “In order to work on a higher frequency, we needed a major technological change. Earlier, our receiver could extract only 32 megahertz, however, with the new technology in place, it can now extract a maximum of 400 megahertz. This increase in capability is due to the upgradation,” Gupta further added. (Sanket Wankhade / HT Photo)

UPDATED ON FEB 03, 2020 11:09 AM IST
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Ashes of Grott Reber,the first radio astronomer, at GMRT. (Sanket Wankhade / HT Photo)

Ashes of Grott Reber,the first radio astronomer, at GMRT. (Sanket Wankhade / HT Photo)

UPDATED ON FEB 03, 2020 11:09 AM IST
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There are 30 fully steerable antennas of 45 metre diameter each in ‘Y’ shape spread over 25 km region of land here at GMRT. Govind Swarup, a global pioneer of radio astronomy is the man behind building the GMRT, while it started its routine operations in 2000. (Sanket Wankhade / HT Photo)

There are 30 fully steerable antennas of 45 metre diameter each in ‘Y’ shape spread over 25 km region of land here at GMRT. Govind Swarup, a global pioneer of radio astronomy is the man behind building the GMRT, while it started its routine operations in 2000. (Sanket Wankhade / HT Photo)

UPDATED ON FEB 03, 2020 11:09 AM IST
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A team of astronomers at NCRA , on January 3, discovered a ’mysterious’ ring of hydrogen gas around a distant galaxy, using the GMRT. The ring is much bigger than the galaxy it surrounds and has a diametre about four times that of our Milky Way, according to NCRA researchers. The galaxy discovered (named AGC 203001), is located about 260 million light-years away from earth. (Sanket Wankhade / HT Photo)

A team of astronomers at NCRA , on January 3, discovered a ’mysterious’ ring of hydrogen gas around a distant galaxy, using the GMRT. The ring is much bigger than the galaxy it surrounds and has a diametre about four times that of our Milky Way, according to NCRA researchers. The galaxy discovered (named AGC 203001), is located about 260 million light-years away from earth. (Sanket Wankhade / HT Photo)

UPDATED ON FEB 03, 2020 11:09 AM IST
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