Photos: Catalans take to the streets after leaders sent to prison

UPDATED ON OCT 15, 2019 01:47 PM IST
Protesters stand behind a banner reading in Catalan, “Freedom for Political Prisoners” at El Prat airport in Barcelona. Spain’s Supreme Court on Monday jailed nine Catalan separatist leaders for between nine and 13 years for their role in a failed independence bid, a decision that triggered mass protests in the region and left the future course of the dispute uncertain. (Emilio Morenatti / AP)
Police officers stand by a doorway as protestors sit down blocking access to El Prat airport. Barcelona’s international airport became the focal point of the protests. As thousands rallied at its entrance, riot police charged at the crowd on several occasions using batons and firing foam balls to prevent the risk of a forced mass entry, police said. At least three people were arrested in the region. (Emilio Morenatti / AP)
The Tsunami Democratic group which had called the protest promised a series of coordinated actions to follow. “We rest to return to the streets tomorrow. And the next day,” it said in a tweet, condemning the use of force by police against what it said was a “non-violent mobilisation”. Local media cited health services as saying over 50 people required medical attention after the clashes. (Albert Gea / REUTERS)
Earlier, acting Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez said the sentence signified the defeat of the independence movement, whose campaign has caused Spain’s most serious political crisis since the death of dictator Francisco Franco four decades ago. (Paul White / AP)
The strength of the protests could be the first indication of how the future looks for the independence struggle, which has so far been largely peaceful. Nor does the ruling answer the question of how to handle the separatism drive supported by nearly half of Catalonia’s population. “Today we are all convicted, not just 12 people,” said the president of the Catalan parliament, Roger Torrent. (Emilio Morenatti / AP)
People hold placards depicting pictures of jailed Catalan separatist leaders. The longest prison term - 13 years - was imposed on the Catalan government’s former deputy leader, Oriol Junqueras. The court convicted him and eight other leaders on charges of sedition and four of them of misuse of public funds. Three others were found guilty of disobedience and not sentenced to prison. All defendants were acquitted of the gravest charge, rebellion. (Pau Barrena / AFP)
“What happened on October 1 (in 2017) was not just a demonstration or a massive act of citizen protest,” the Madrid court said in its ruling. “It was a tumultuous uprising encouraged by the accused, among many others.” Cabinet spokeswoman Isabel Celaa said the government hoped first of all to promote understanding within the region, saying: “Catalonia must start a dialogue with Catalonia. ... This is precisely the basis for a co-existence,” she said. (Francois Lenoir / REUTERS)
Former Catalan President Carles Puigdemont holds a news conference in Brussels, Belgium, after Spain’s Supreme Court order. The court also issued a European arrest warrant for Puigdemont. He now lives in self-imposed exile in Belgium. In July 2018, the Spanish court dropped a warrant after Germany refused to extradite him. (Francois Lenoir / REUTERS)
The jailed men sent out messages of defiance, urging people to take to the streets. In Barcelona, protesters blocked streets holding signs of “Freedom for political prisoners” A crowd chanted: “We’ll do it again” - a slogan used by separatist supporters who want to hold another referendum. The ruling is also likely to colour a national election on November 10, Spain’s fourth in four years. (Albert Gea / REUTERS)

Protesters stand behind a banner reading in Catalan, “Freedom for Political Prisoners” at El Prat airport in Barcelona. Spain’s Supreme Court on Monday jailed nine Catalan separatist leaders for between nine and 13 years for their role in a failed independence bid, a decision that triggered mass protests in the region and left the future course of the dispute uncertain. (Emilio Morenatti / AP)

Police officers stand by a doorway as protestors sit down blocking access to El Prat airport. Barcelona’s international airport became the focal point of the protests. As thousands rallied at its entrance, riot police charged at the crowd on several occasions using batons and firing foam balls to prevent the risk of a forced mass entry, police said. At least three people were arrested in the region. (Emilio Morenatti / AP)

The Tsunami Democratic group which had called the protest promised a series of coordinated actions to follow. “We rest to return to the streets tomorrow. And the next day,” it said in a tweet, condemning the use of force by police against what it said was a “non-violent mobilisation”. Local media cited health services as saying over 50 people required medical attention after the clashes. (Albert Gea / REUTERS)

Earlier, acting Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez said the sentence signified the defeat of the independence movement, whose campaign has caused Spain’s most serious political crisis since the death of dictator Francisco Franco four decades ago. (Paul White / AP)

The strength of the protests could be the first indication of how the future looks for the independence struggle, which has so far been largely peaceful. Nor does the ruling answer the question of how to handle the separatism drive supported by nearly half of Catalonia’s population. “Today we are all convicted, not just 12 people,” said the president of the Catalan parliament, Roger Torrent. (Emilio Morenatti / AP)

People hold placards depicting pictures of jailed Catalan separatist leaders. The longest prison term - 13 years - was imposed on the Catalan government’s former deputy leader, Oriol Junqueras. The court convicted him and eight other leaders on charges of sedition and four of them of misuse of public funds. Three others were found guilty of disobedience and not sentenced to prison. All defendants were acquitted of the gravest charge, rebellion. (Pau Barrena / AFP)

“What happened on October 1 (in 2017) was not just a demonstration or a massive act of citizen protest,” the Madrid court said in its ruling. “It was a tumultuous uprising encouraged by the accused, among many others.” Cabinet spokeswoman Isabel Celaa said the government hoped first of all to promote understanding within the region, saying: “Catalonia must start a dialogue with Catalonia. ... This is precisely the basis for a co-existence,” she said. (Francois Lenoir / REUTERS)

Former Catalan President Carles Puigdemont holds a news conference in Brussels, Belgium, after Spain’s Supreme Court order. The court also issued a European arrest warrant for Puigdemont. He now lives in self-imposed exile in Belgium. In July 2018, the Spanish court dropped a warrant after Germany refused to extradite him. (Francois Lenoir / REUTERS)

The jailed men sent out messages of defiance, urging people to take to the streets. In Barcelona, protesters blocked streets holding signs of “Freedom for political prisoners” A crowd chanted: “We’ll do it again” - a slogan used by separatist supporters who want to hold another referendum. The ruling is also likely to colour a national election on November 10, Spain’s fourth in four years. (Albert Gea / REUTERS)

About The Gallery

Spain's Supreme Court on Monday sentenced nine Catalan separatist leaders to between nine and 13 years in prison for sedition over their role in a failed independence bid, triggering protests across the region. Three other defendants, who were also on trial for their involvement in the October 2017 referendum held in spite of a ban and a short-lived independence declaration, were found guilty only of disobedience and not sentenced to prison. In Barcelona, three main streets were blocked by protesters holding signs calling for "Freedom for political prisoners" and a crowd chanted "We'll do it again" - a slogan used by separatist supporters who want to hold another referendum.

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