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Home / World News / Two-thirds of Americans believe Covid-19 will disrupt November election: Survey

Two-thirds of Americans believe Covid-19 will disrupt November election: Survey

US President Donald Trump had on Monday dismissed allegations by his opponent Joe Biden that he would try to delay the November 3 election.

world Updated: Apr 29, 2020 14:15 IST
HT Correspondent
HT Correspondent
Hindustan Times, New Delhi
Most Americans are somewhat confident that the election will be conducted fairly and accurately, according to the Pew survey.
Most Americans are somewhat confident that the election will be conducted fairly and accurately, according to the Pew survey.(Reuters Photo)

At least two-third of Americans believe that the presidential election in November will be disrupted by the coronavirus crisis, according to the latest Pew research.

The survey is based on 4,917 US adults and was conducted from April 7 to 12.

As many as 67 per cent of Americans believe that it is “very” or “somewhat likely” that the coronavirus outbreak will significantly disrupt people’s ability to vote in the presidential election.

However, most Americans are somewhat confident that the election will be conducted fairly and accurately. But in this category, 46 per cent Democrats are less confident in the fairness and accuracy of the November election.

The survey also asked the people of the United States if they prefer voting by mail, and found 70 per cent respondents saying yes to it. In fact, about half of the population (52%) favours conducting all the elections by mail the Pew survey said.

US President Donald Trump had on Monday dismissed allegations by his opponent Joe Biden that he would try to delay the November 3 election.

“I never even thought of changing the date of the election. Why would I do that? November 3, it’s a good number,” Trump told reporters at his White House news conference.

Meanwhile, Hillary Clinton endorsed Joe Biden’s White House bid on Tuesday, saying the United States needs a “real president” and not just “somebody who plays one on TV.”

“I wish you were president right now,” said Clinton, who headed the Democratic ticket in 2016 but lost to Republican Donald Trump.

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