Twenty-year-old Abha Dubey never had the privilege of using a computer when she was in school in Civil Lines.(HT Photo)
Twenty-year-old Abha Dubey never had the privilege of using a computer when she was in school in Civil Lines.(HT Photo)

Delhi Police’s Yuva scheme touching, changing lives

Two years after graduating from school, she says she has very good knowledge of computers. She says she is grateful to the Delhi Police for helping her know about computers.
Hindustan Times, New Delhi | By HT Correspondent
UPDATED ON JUL 26, 2019 12:29 AM IST

Twenty-year-old Abha Dubey never had the privilege of using a computer when she was in school in Civil Lines.

Two years after graduating from school, she says she has very good knowledge of computers. She says she is grateful to the Delhi Police for helping her know about computers.

“There was a gap in my skill set when I graduated from school. That gap was filled by the training programme imparted at a Delhi police station. After completion of the two-month programme, I was the only one in my class who had a basic knowledge of computers,” said Dubey.

Dubey learnt about the course offered by the police through an NGO worker who used to frequent the slum where she once stayed near Delhi’s Civil Lines area.

Two years since Delhi Police launched its Yuva scheme — a project to impart job-oriented skills to the city’s vulnerable youngsters — at least 4,521 persons have bagged jobs, ranging from that of beauticians to computer data operators to cell phone technicians to front office executives

Launched in 2017 by Delhi’s lieutenant governor (LG) Anil Baijal and former home minister Rajnath Singh, the Yuva scheme aimed to wean vulnerable youngsters away from crime and train them in job-oriented courses. Police have since trained over 9,000 youngsters of which more than 4,500 have bagged jobs.

The initiative was launched under the Pradhan Mantri Kaushal Vikas Yojna (PMKVY) of the Union ministry ofskill development by Delhi Police.

Of the 209 police stations in Delhi, in at least 22 police stations such skill development training programmes are held every day.

Senior police officers said that two years ago, the L-G told police that prevention of crime begins when one prevents teenagers from turning to crime. Police were then directed to identify teenagers, who came from an underprivileged background or who were first-time offenders and then impart them skills to help them find jobs.

Devesh Srivastava, joint commissioner of police, who is also the nodal officer of the programme, said, “We select youngsters between the age of 17 and 25 years. Some of them have started receiving salaries ranging from 12,000 to 21,000. We have the patronage of the lieutenant governor, who has been a pillar of support in this initiative. The results are constantly monitored by the police commissioner.”

Under the initiative, police identify youngsters who are school dropouts, juvenile offenders, victims of crimes and/or are the wards of undertrials.

“Many of these youngsters have grown up in an environment where they can be easily lured into the world of crime. By training job-oriented skills to them and helping them find employment, we are able to wean them away from criminal activities,” said Srivastava, adding that private firms have been visiting to offer jobs to those passing these courses.

Surya Prakash Chaubey, who has been roped in as a trainer for this programme, said that his team imparts training at four police stations – Jyoti Nagar, New Usmanpur, South Rohini and Vasant Kunj.

“We trained nearly 400 youngsters at Jyoti Nagar police station last year. Almost 90% of them have bagged jobs,” said Chaubey.

Chaubey added that his team imparted various skills to youngsters like that of data entry operators, make-up artistes and mobile phone technicians.

Another trainer, Ravi Singh, said that his team imparts a three-month course in beauty and wellness at Anand

Parbat police station in central Delhi.

“We have two faculties imparting eight hours of training everyday. The students are divided into batches of 20 each,” said Singh.

The success stories of Yuva programme are many.

Twenty-one-year-old Suraj Kant works as a peon at a BPO today.

Two years ago, he had dropped out of Class 11 of a Delhi government school inTimarpur. A police officer had then spotted him hanging around at his north Delhi home with some youngsters, who had criminal records. Kant was invited by a police officer to join the training programme and learn skills. He took up English speaking classes.

Today, he earns 12,000 as a peon.

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