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Home / India News / Consortiums can set up medical colleges

Consortiums can set up medical colleges

The medical education regulator notified the changes on May 14 as part of efforts to encourage private sector participation in strengthening the country’s medical education infrastructure.

india Updated: Jun 23, 2019 07:11 IST
Rhythma Kaul
Rhythma Kaul
New Delhi, Hindustan Times
India had around 1.04 million registered allopathic doctors by the end of 2017 to treat a population of 1.36 billion people, according to the National Health Profile, 2018.
India had around 1.04 million registered allopathic doctors by the end of 2017 to treat a population of 1.36 billion people, according to the National Health Profile, 2018.(HT file photo)

The Medical Council of India-Board of Governors (MCI-BoG) has notified amendments to the Establishment of Medical College Regulations, 1999, that will allow a consortium to apply for the establishment of new medical colleges.

The medical education regulator notified the changes on May 14 as part of efforts to encourage private sector participation in strengthening the country’s medical education infrastructure.

India had around 1.04 million registered allopathic doctors by the end of 2017 to treat a population of 1.36 billion people, according to the National Health Profile, 2018. The World Health Organisation prescribes a doctor-population ratio of 1:1,000. In India, it was 0.62:1,000 by 2017-end.

At least two, and a maximum of four, with diverse expertise and business — such as private companies, societies, trusts, hospitals, land developers, and universities, including deemed universities — can now collaborate to set up a medical college, which needs to be attached to a teaching hospital where MBBS students can get hands-on training and expertise in treatment under the supervision of the senior faculty.

“The move is aimed at making it easier to set up a medical college by allowing a group of people or organisations to collaborate,” said MCI-BoG chairman Dr VK Paul. He said India has about 250 privately run medical colleges in India, and the amendment will increase private participation in the sector under the public-private partnership model.

Applications to build a medical college can now be made through the leader of a consortium with the biggest stake in the partnership. A hospital attached to a new college built under the revised rules must have 300 beds, with 120 of them for surgical specialties, 120 for medical specialties, and 60 for obstetrics and gynaecology.

Public Health Foundation of India’s Dr K Srinath Reddy said the model will work in principle if there is coordination between medical colleges and other partners. “A medical college should take all decisions related to charges for services to ensure students and patients are not overcharged,” Reddy said.

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