Centre's water policy document dictatorial: Singh | india | Hindustan Times
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Centre's water policy document dictatorial: Singh

Terming the Central government's new Water Policy as a "dangerous and dictatorial document", Magsasay award winner social activist, Rajendra Singh, today rejected the policy alleging that it gave propriety rights over water to private companies.

india Updated: Jun 18, 2003 12:58 IST

Terming the Central government's new Water Policy as a "dangerous and dictatorial document", Magsasay award winner social activist, Rajendra Singh, today rejected the policy alleging that it gave propriety rights over water to private companies.

The new Water Policy "gives propriety rights over natural resource of water to multinational companies. The real intention of the new Water Policy seems to be to establish influence of foreign powers in India again", Singh told reporters after completing first phase of his 'Water March' in 17 drought and famine hit states, including southern states.

"We reject this policy because it has no concern for the Indian society as it gives prorietory rights over water to private companies," he said.

The 73rd and 75th constitutional amendments provided management of water resources to village panchayats and urban municipalities but the new policy negates it, he added.

Singh said the Rashtriya Jal Biradari will hold programmes all over the country on June 26 to oppose the water policy and demand its scrapping.

He also opposed the proposal to link major rivers on the grounds that it would create more ecological and other problems instead of solving any.

Community and village level water conservation was the only solution for solving water problem in the country which had a rich tradition of water conservation, he said.

The 'water march' started from Raj Ghat in Delhi on December 23 last year, which has already passed through 17 states, has found 'water mafias' operating in several places such as Chhatishgarh and Orissa.

However, he said, there were silver linings also where village communities had been managing the natural resource in these areas besides Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh and Karnataka.