Indore pig deaths spark virus fears | india | Hindustan Times
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Indore pig deaths spark virus fears

THE BODIES of ten pigs were recovered from near MOG Lines on Saturday sparking fears that the avian influenza virus had managed to penetrate the City?s porcine population. The pigs were however buried without post-mortem and the cause of their death would remain a mystery.

india Updated: Mar 19, 2006 13:22 IST

THE BODIES of ten pigs were recovered from near MOG Lines on Saturday sparking fears that the avian influenza virus had managed to penetrate the City’s porcine population. The pigs were however buried without post-mortem and the cause of their death would remain a mystery.

The dead animals, including three piglets, were discovered in the morning by residents who informed the Indore Municipal Corporation (IMC). Health department staffers later carted off the carcasses to the Devguradia trenching grounds where the animals were buried.

As no post-mortem was conducted the exact cause of the pigs’ death could not be ascertained. IMC officials, however, discounted fears that the deaths could be a result of an outbreak of the H5N1 (bird flu) virus.

“Nearly 400 pigs in the City have died over the last 4 months. During the last bird flu scare we carried out random post-mortems and the cause of death was found to be viral pneumonia. In all probability, the animals buried today died of the same disease”, informed IMC Health Officer Dr MK Gautam.

He said no post mortem had been conducted because the bodies had been found in an advanced stage of decomposition.
“A post-mortem will definitely be carried out the next time a pig carcass is found”, stressed Dr Gautam.

The first priority would be to get the test done at Veterinary College, Mhow, as it is better equipped in terms of manpower and machinery. Failing this, the post-mortem would be carried out at the Patthar Godaam Hospital, he added.

Meanwhile rapid response teams, formed by the Animal Husbandry department, scoured backyard poultry farms on the lookout for any birds displaying tell-tale H5N1 virus symptoms

Alarm bells in Mhow too
A MYSTERY disease has claimed the lives of nearly 500 pigs in Mhow over the last fortnight sending alarm bells ringing among district administration officials and pigsty owners. P2

‘No need to panic’
Professor of Community Medicine Dr Sanjay Dixit said that it is highly unlikely that the avian influenza virus has killed the pigs. Unlike earlier strains that passed from poultry animals to pigs and then on to humans, the current subtype (H5N1) is jumping directly from birds to humans.