Jagannath yatra: The Lord’s journey | india | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Feb 19, 2018-Monday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Jagannath yatra: The Lord’s journey

The Lord Jagannath Rath Yatra started from Puri on Tuesday, and lakhs of devotees from home and abroad thronged the abode of the Lord. Puri steals the limelight because of the history associated with it, as well as for its importance for being one of the four dhams.

india Updated: Jul 13, 2010 23:22 IST
RL Pathak

The Lord Jagannath Rath Yatra started from Puri on Tuesday, and lakhs of devotees from home and abroad thronged the abode of the Lord. Puri steals the limelight because of the history associated with it, as well as for its importance for being one of the four dhams.

The Jagannatha temple is impressive and huge. At the entrance, there is ‘Aruna Pillar’ brought over from Konark. One can have the darshana of Lord Jagannatha from this point. A little distance away, there is Vishwanatha Linga. Legend has it that one Brahmin wanted to go to Kashi. Jagannath told him to worship that Linga which would bring him to the desired benediction of Nishannatho.

Though the worship of Lord Jagannath had started much earlier, the main temple was constructed in the 12th century. The construction started during the reign of Anantavarma, the first ruler of Chodagangadeva but was completed by the fourth successor, Anangabhimadeva.

Rath Yatra marks the annual ritual which draws huge crowds from all over the globe to elicit the blessings of Vishnu as Jagannath, the Lord of the Universe – Shapeless, formless like the Universe itself.

As part of the celebration of this grand festival, the three images of Lord Jagannatha, Balbhadra and Subhadra are dislodged from the sanctum sanctorum and are brought on to the big chariots and are carried to Gundicha where they are kept for nine days and then are brought back to the main temple with the same pomp and show.

The great thing about the Rath Yatra is that in the whole exercise one would not discern any ‘high and low’ kind of discrimination but would instead find the king and the sweeper pulling the chariots with equal rights and faith. The nine-day festival brings new colour and charm to the otherwise sleepy town of Puri which comes agog with colour and life and permeates the spirit of universal fraternity.

It is supreme faith unto the ‘unseen’ which lubricates the chariots of our lives on earth and inspire us to lead lives worthy of His blessings.