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Work pending, city has 200 spots of bother

While the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) claims it will complete all unfinished surface work before rains arrive, the civic body is banking on a late monsoon.

mumbai Updated: Jun 10, 2019 03:52 IST
Eeshanpriya MS
Eeshanpriya MS
Hindustan Times, Mumbai
mumbai housing,mumbai rehabilitation,mumbai urban issues
Road work going at Dadar opposite Citra Cinema in Mumbai.(Kunal Patil/Hindustan Times)

In what could spell trouble for the city when it sees its first pre-monsoon showers, there are a whopping 200-odd spots identified by the Mumbai civic body where pre-monsoon work has not yet completed, as of Friday last week.

The BMC’s deadline for completing pre-monsoon work every year is May 31.

This means the spots are still witnessing either trenches on roads, dug-up or non-concretised roads and footpaths, leftover loose soil, gravel and stones, and uneven and unfinished road and footpath surfaces.

While the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) claims it will complete all unfinished surface work before rains arrive, the civic body is banking on a late monsoon.

Municipal commissioner Pravin Pardeshi said on Friday, “By June 20, none of this will be there. We have an opportunity, because monsoon is expected to arrive by June 18 or so. So we have about eight-10 days as buffer. There are about 200-odd sidestrips on roads, where work is going on. But it will be done.”

Weather forecasting agency Skymet predicted earlier that monsoon is likely to arrive in Mumbai between June 15 and 18. The state government on Sunday issued an advisory based on Indian Meteorological Department’s (IMD) predictions, that Mumbai was likely to see pre-monsoon showers from June 12 onward.

The municipal commissioner was unavailable for a comment on Sunday.

However, with a large amount of surfacing work pending, experts believe this is going to lead to potholes, clogged drains from loose soil and gravel at the unfinished construction sites, and an overall bad monsoon experience for commuters.

Nandkumar Salvi, retired BMC engineer said, “It is understandable that at some places contractors cannot strictly stick to deadline, because of the large amount of work and its nature. BMC still should have finished everything by June 10.”

Nikhil Desai, AGNI — a citizens’ group that works for better governance — said, “The main problem is poor planning by the civic body. Corporators should pressurise the civic body to meet deadlines.”

Desai added, “The consequences of unfinished work are clogged drains and more potholes. All this loose soil or gravel will get washed away by rainwater into the drains, and will clog them. If the road is concretised and footpaths made freshly just before it rains, logged water will corrode the surface, and this can lead to bad patches on the roadside.”

First Published: Jun 10, 2019 03:52 IST

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