India's most wanted man

UPDATED ON APR 04, 2012 05:23 PM IST 11 Photos
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Police escort Hafiz Saeed, the head of the banned Jamaat-ud-Dawa and founder of Lashkar-e-Taiba, as he leaves after an appearance in court in Lahore May 5, 2009. Reuters/Mohsin Raza

Police escort Hafiz Saeed, the head of the banned Jamaat-ud-Dawa and founder of Lashkar-e-Taiba, as he leaves after an appearance in court in Lahore May 5, 2009. Reuters/Mohsin Raza

UPDATED ON APR 04, 2012 05:23 PM IST
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Hafiz Saeed, the head of Jamaat-ud-Dawa and founder of Lashkar-e-Taiba, attends an anti-American rally in Islamabad March 27, 2012. The United States has put up a $10 million reward to help arrest Pakistani Islamist leader Hafiz Mohammad Saeed, suspected of masterminding two spectacular attacks on India's financial capital and its parliament. Reuters/Faisal Mahmood

Hafiz Saeed, the head of Jamaat-ud-Dawa and founder of Lashkar-e-Taiba, attends an anti-American rally in Islamabad March 27, 2012. The United States has put up a $10 million reward to help arrest Pakistani Islamist leader Hafiz Mohammad Saeed, suspected of masterminding two spectacular attacks on India's financial capital and its parliament. Reuters/Faisal Mahmood

UPDATED ON APR 04, 2012 05:23 PM IST
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Hafiz Saeed speaks to gathering during an anti-American and Indian rally on the grounds of the Minar-e-Pakistan in Lahore December 18, 2011. About 30,000 Islamists staged a protest on Sunday to condemn the United States and show support for Pakistan's military, which has reasserted itself after a cross-border Nato attack and a controversial memo that has weakened the civilian government. Reuters/Mohsin Raza

Hafiz Saeed speaks to gathering during an anti-American and Indian rally on the grounds of the Minar-e-Pakistan in Lahore December 18, 2011. About 30,000 Islamists staged a protest on Sunday to condemn the United States and show support for Pakistan's military, which has reasserted itself after a cross-border Nato attack and a controversial memo that has weakened the civilian government. Reuters/Mohsin Raza

UPDATED ON APR 04, 2012 05:23 PM IST
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A private security guard stands outside the residence of Hafiz Saeed, the head of Jamaat-ud-Dawa and founder of Lashkar-e-Taiba, in Lahore. Reuters/Mohsin Raza

A private security guard stands outside the residence of Hafiz Saeed, the head of Jamaat-ud-Dawa and founder of Lashkar-e-Taiba, in Lahore. Reuters/Mohsin Raza

UPDATED ON APR 04, 2012 05:23 PM IST
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Hafiz Muhammad Saeed speaks during a protest rally in Karachi September 7, 2008, condemning atrocities in Indian-controlled Kashmir. Hundreds of Jamaat ud Dawa activists held a rally to express solidarity with Indian Kashmiri Muslims. Reuters/Athar Hussain

Hafiz Muhammad Saeed speaks during a protest rally in Karachi September 7, 2008, condemning atrocities in Indian-controlled Kashmir. Hundreds of Jamaat ud Dawa activists held a rally to express solidarity with Indian Kashmiri Muslims. Reuters/Athar Hussain

UPDATED ON APR 04, 2012 05:23 PM IST
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Hafiz Muhammad Saeed speaks during a protest rally in Islamabad August 31, 2008. Reuters/Faisal Mahmood

Hafiz Muhammad Saeed speaks during a protest rally in Islamabad August 31, 2008. Reuters/Faisal Mahmood

UPDATED ON APR 04, 2012 05:23 PM IST
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Police escort Hafiz Saeed as he leaves after an appearance in court in Lahore March 9, 2009. Reuters/Mohsin Raza

Police escort Hafiz Saeed as he leaves after an appearance in court in Lahore March 9, 2009. Reuters/Mohsin Raza

UPDATED ON APR 04, 2012 05:23 PM IST
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Hafiz Mohammad Saeed, a top Pakistan militant leader seen in this January 2001 file photograph, has been detained by Pakistani authorities, a security source said on December 31, 2001. Reuters

Hafiz Mohammad Saeed, a top Pakistan militant leader seen in this January 2001 file photograph, has been detained by Pakistani authorities, a security source said on December 31, 2001. Reuters

UPDATED ON APR 04, 2012 05:23 PM IST
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A supporter of the banned Islamic organization Jamaat-ud-Dawa holds a party flag and an image of al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden during an anti-American rally in Lahore May 15, 2011. Reuters/Mohsin Raza

A supporter of the banned Islamic organization Jamaat-ud-Dawa holds a party flag and an image of al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden during an anti-American rally in Lahore May 15, 2011. Reuters/Mohsin Raza

UPDATED ON APR 04, 2012 05:23 PM IST
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Supporters of the banned Islamic organization Jamaat-ud-Dawa embrace each other after taking part in a funeral prayer for al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden in Karachi May 3, 2011. Reuters/Athar Hussain

Supporters of the banned Islamic organization Jamaat-ud-Dawa embrace each other after taking part in a funeral prayer for al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden in Karachi May 3, 2011. Reuters/Athar Hussain

UPDATED ON APR 04, 2012 05:23 PM IST
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Pakistani non-Muslim minority supporters of Islamist charity organisation Jamaat-ud-Dawa protest in Hyderabad December 16, 2008. Reuters/Akram Shahid

Pakistani non-Muslim minority supporters of Islamist charity organisation Jamaat-ud-Dawa protest in Hyderabad December 16, 2008. Reuters/Akram Shahid

UPDATED ON APR 04, 2012 05:23 PM IST
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