Photos: Brazil crosses 2 million coronavirus cases, over 77,000 dead

Updated On Jul 18, 2020 06:04 PM IST

Brazil on July 16 passed the 2 million mark for confirmed coronavirus cases, a grim milestone in the country with the worst outbreak after the United States. Brazil has added the last one miliion cases in under a month amid a rapidly shifting domestic outbreak. The figures follow a World Health Organization warning that Brazil’s outbreak may not hit peak until August. Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, who last week was himself diagnosed with the virus, has repeatedly minimized the seriousness of the disease. That position has pitted him against local officials over responses including lockdowns and the use of face masks.

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Relatives react near the grave of Neusa Freitas dos Santos, 81, who died from the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) after the burial at Vila Formosa cemetery, in Sao Paulo, Brazil on July 16. Brazil, the largest country in South America has passed 2 million confirmed cases of coronavirus infections and logged over 77,000 lives lost to the Covid-19 disease. (Amanda Perobelli / REUTERS) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jul 18, 2020 06:04 PM IST

Relatives react near the grave of Neusa Freitas dos Santos, 81, who died from the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) after the burial at Vila Formosa cemetery, in Sao Paulo, Brazil on July 16. Brazil, the largest country in South America has passed 2 million confirmed cases of coronavirus infections and logged over 77,000 lives lost to the Covid-19 disease. (Amanda Perobelli / REUTERS)

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Gravediggers wearing protective suits bury a coffin at Vila Formosa cemetery in Sao Paulo on July 16. The country took four months to cross a million Covid-19 cases on June 19 after recording its first case on February 26. The second million took just 28 days. Since late May, the country has recorded more than 1,000 daily deaths on average, AP reported. (Amanda Perobelli / REUTERS) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jul 18, 2020 06:04 PM IST

Gravediggers wearing protective suits bury a coffin at Vila Formosa cemetery in Sao Paulo on July 16. The country took four months to cross a million Covid-19 cases on June 19 after recording its first case on February 26. The second million took just 28 days. Since late May, the country has recorded more than 1,000 daily deaths on average, AP reported. (Amanda Perobelli / REUTERS)

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People walk at a popular shopping street amid the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Sao Paulo on July 15. Brazil is the second worst affected country in the world by the coronavirus after the United States. “Two million is a symbolic number because we don’t have wide scale testing,” infectious disease expert from the Albert Einstein hospital in Sao Paulo, Jean Gorinchteyn told AFP. (Amanda Perobelli / REUTERS) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jul 18, 2020 06:04 PM IST

People walk at a popular shopping street amid the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Sao Paulo on July 15. Brazil is the second worst affected country in the world by the coronavirus after the United States. “Two million is a symbolic number because we don’t have wide scale testing,” infectious disease expert from the Albert Einstein hospital in Sao Paulo, Jean Gorinchteyn told AFP. (Amanda Perobelli / REUTERS)

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Health workers take residents' blood samples at a testing site for COVID-19 in Rio de Janeiro on July 17. Over the last two months, Brazil has recorded more than 30,000 new cases in a day 26 times, and on 11 of those occasions there were more than 40,000 infections, AFP reported. (Silvia Izquierdo / AP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jul 18, 2020 06:04 PM IST

Health workers take residents' blood samples at a testing site for COVID-19 in Rio de Janeiro on July 17. Over the last two months, Brazil has recorded more than 30,000 new cases in a day 26 times, and on 11 of those occasions there were more than 40,000 infections, AFP reported. (Silvia Izquierdo / AP)

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Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro who is also infected with COVID-19, feeds a rhea outside his residence Alvorada Palace in Brasilia on July 17. According to the AP, experts blame the virus’ spread on denial of its potential by President Bolsonaro and a lack of national coordination combined with scattershot responses by city and state governments, with some reopening earlier than health experts recommended. (Eraldo Peres / AP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jul 18, 2020 06:04 PM IST

Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro who is also infected with COVID-19, feeds a rhea outside his residence Alvorada Palace in Brasilia on July 17. According to the AP, experts blame the virus’ spread on denial of its potential by President Bolsonaro and a lack of national coordination combined with scattershot responses by city and state governments, with some reopening earlier than health experts recommended. (Eraldo Peres / AP)

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A COVID-19 positive patient receives medical care on a plane equipped as an ICU unit during the trip from the municipality of Almeirim to the city of Santarem in Para state, Brazil on July 15. A model created by professors from several Brazilian academic institutions, based on the number of confirmed deaths, estimates Brazil has had 10 million infections. (Tarso Sarraf / AFP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jul 18, 2020 06:04 PM IST

A COVID-19 positive patient receives medical care on a plane equipped as an ICU unit during the trip from the municipality of Almeirim to the city of Santarem in Para state, Brazil on July 15. A model created by professors from several Brazilian academic institutions, based on the number of confirmed deaths, estimates Brazil has had 10 million infections. (Tarso Sarraf / AFP)

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People wearing face masks walk in 25 de Marco, a popular shopping street in Sao Paulo on July 16. Brazil’s roughly 7,000 COVID-19 deaths in each of the last seven weeks is equal to several aeroplanes packed with Brazilians crashing every day, former health minister Luiz Henrique Mandetta told The Associated Press. (Alexandre Schneider / Getty Images) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jul 18, 2020 06:04 PM IST

People wearing face masks walk in 25 de Marco, a popular shopping street in Sao Paulo on July 16. Brazil’s roughly 7,000 COVID-19 deaths in each of the last seven weeks is equal to several aeroplanes packed with Brazilians crashing every day, former health minister Luiz Henrique Mandetta told The Associated Press. (Alexandre Schneider / Getty Images)

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Cemetery workers in protective suits use a lift to carry out a wall crypt burial as family members look on at the Caju cemetery in Rio de Janeiro on July 16. “People have become callous,” Mandetta said. “When you say, ‘Yesterday there were 1,300 deaths,’ people say, ‘OK, then it didn’t go up. It was 1,300 people the day before, too.’” (Luis Alvarenga / Getty Images) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jul 18, 2020 06:04 PM IST

Cemetery workers in protective suits use a lift to carry out a wall crypt burial as family members look on at the Caju cemetery in Rio de Janeiro on July 16. “People have become callous,” Mandetta said. “When you say, ‘Yesterday there were 1,300 deaths,’ people say, ‘OK, then it didn’t go up. It was 1,300 people the day before, too.’” (Luis Alvarenga / Getty Images)

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