Photos: Young Israelis get creative in their protests

Updated On Jul 27, 2020 06:32 PM IST

The current protests that Israel has been witnessing against Prime Minister Netanyuhu are somewhat carnivalesque in nature yet embodied with a looming sense of desperation and disillusionment. Protest culture in Israel isn’t new, but what has repeatedly brought a younger generation of Israelis back on the streets is – an unprecedented economic crisis in the pandemic brought by coronavirus and reluctance of the country’s leadership to bring timely resolutions to the situation. New cases continue to spike to record levels, and unemployment remains over 20%, up from 3.9% before the pandemic.

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Zohar Yaar, 23, poses for a photo during a protest against Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, outside his residence in Jerusalem on July 23. A wave of colourful and combative demonstrations against Netanyahu and his perceived failure to handle the country’s deepening economic crisis have been characterized by youth. (Oded Balilty / AP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jul 27, 2020 06:32 PM IST

Zohar Yaar, 23, poses for a photo during a protest against Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, outside his residence in Jerusalem on July 23. A wave of colourful and combative demonstrations against Netanyahu and his perceived failure to handle the country’s deepening economic crisis have been characterized by youth. (Oded Balilty / AP)

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An Israeli family poses for a photo during a protest in Jerusalem on July 23. With flags, facemasks, drums, placards and an assortment of props, thousands have been taking to the streets to demand change in a variety of unique ways. (Oded Balilty / AP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jul 27, 2020 06:32 PM IST

An Israeli family poses for a photo during a protest in Jerusalem on July 23. With flags, facemasks, drums, placards and an assortment of props, thousands have been taking to the streets to demand change in a variety of unique ways. (Oded Balilty / AP)

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Maayan Segal, 37, seen in their protest ensemble in Jerusalem on July 24. PM Netanyahu, standing trial for corruption, has tried to dismiss the youthful protesters as radicals and anarchists flouting public health restrictions while he marshals the country through a national emergency, AP reported. (Oded Balilty / AP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jul 27, 2020 06:32 PM IST

Maayan Segal, 37, seen in their protest ensemble in Jerusalem on July 24. PM Netanyahu, standing trial for corruption, has tried to dismiss the youthful protesters as radicals and anarchists flouting public health restrictions while he marshals the country through a national emergency, AP reported. (Oded Balilty / AP)

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Tel Bluver, 32, poses for a photo with his drum as he readies to participate in a protest in Jerusalem on July 23. According to an AP report, thousands now taking to the streets several times a week come from all walks of life and with unemployment surging to record numbers they demand a reckoning from the leader. (Oded Balilty / AP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jul 27, 2020 06:32 PM IST

Tel Bluver, 32, poses for a photo with his drum as he readies to participate in a protest in Jerusalem on July 23. According to an AP report, thousands now taking to the streets several times a week come from all walks of life and with unemployment surging to record numbers they demand a reckoning from the leader. (Oded Balilty / AP)

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Michal Esther Katzir, 35, carries a placard in Hebrew that reads “Our strength is in our unity” in Jerusalem on July 23. The current line of protests stem from Israel’s long tradition of popular political protests that have transcended the partisan divide and brought people together on everyday issues afflicting everyone, such as the massive cost-of-living protests in 2011. (Oded Balilty / AP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jul 27, 2020 06:32 PM IST

Michal Esther Katzir, 35, carries a placard in Hebrew that reads “Our strength is in our unity” in Jerusalem on July 23. The current line of protests stem from Israel’s long tradition of popular political protests that have transcended the partisan divide and brought people together on everyday issues afflicting everyone, such as the massive cost-of-living protests in 2011. (Oded Balilty / AP)

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Dan Lantzet, 32, holds a sign in Hebrew that reads, “Corrupted, we are fed up” in Jerusalem on July 23. AP reported that the current wave has seen the largest turnout since 2011 protests. Energized by a younger, more defiant crowd that’s feeling the sting firsthand, organizers hope the movement can maintain momentum, despite health-related restrictions on gatherings. (Oded Balilty / AP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jul 27, 2020 06:32 PM IST

Dan Lantzet, 32, holds a sign in Hebrew that reads, “Corrupted, we are fed up” in Jerusalem on July 23. AP reported that the current wave has seen the largest turnout since 2011 protests. Energized by a younger, more defiant crowd that’s feeling the sting firsthand, organizers hope the movement can maintain momentum, despite health-related restrictions on gatherings. (Oded Balilty / AP)

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Avishag Gaya, 24, during a protest in Jerusalem on July 23. “Corona is just this magnifying glass that enhances everything that is already wrong with this country. We’ve reached this critical mass where we just have to do something,” Nimrod Gross, a first time protester told AP. “We just don’t believe them anymore. They have no shame.” (Oded Balilty / AP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jul 27, 2020 06:32 PM IST

Avishag Gaya, 24, during a protest in Jerusalem on July 23. “Corona is just this magnifying glass that enhances everything that is already wrong with this country. We’ve reached this critical mass where we just have to do something,” Nimrod Gross, a first time protester told AP. “We just don’t believe them anymore. They have no shame.” (Oded Balilty / AP)

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Nir Barak, 35, poses for a photo during a protest in Jerusalem on July 23. It’s too early to say if the outpouring will generate the type of “revolution” that some of its activists advocate. But the broad, diverse swath of protesters, and the desperate atmosphere and sudden lack of opportunities for young Israelis, has provided fertile ground, wrote AP. (Oded Balilty / AP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jul 27, 2020 06:32 PM IST

Nir Barak, 35, poses for a photo during a protest in Jerusalem on July 23. It’s too early to say if the outpouring will generate the type of “revolution” that some of its activists advocate. But the broad, diverse swath of protesters, and the desperate atmosphere and sudden lack of opportunities for young Israelis, has provided fertile ground, wrote AP. (Oded Balilty / AP)

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