Undone without some fun

Updated On Feb 22, 2012 10:40 PM IST
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A carnival reveller participates in the Torres Vedras parade. The Portuguese have mostly quietly accepted reforms in the labour market, soaring unemployment and cuts to welfare to rein in their debt mountain - but calls to cancel the centuries-old tradition of carnival went a step too far. The government tried, in the name of austerity imposed by international lenders, to force the end of Tuesday's public holiday but the country effectively shut down all the same as the Portuguese refused to go without their pre-Lent festival. REUTERS/Jose Manuel Ribeiro View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Feb 22, 2012 10:40 PM IST

A carnival reveller participates in the Torres Vedras parade. The Portuguese have mostly quietly accepted reforms in the labour market, soaring unemployment and cuts to welfare to rein in their debt mountain - but calls to cancel the centuries-old tradition of carnival went a step too far. The government tried, in the name of austerity imposed by international lenders, to force the end of Tuesday's public holiday but the country effectively shut down all the same as the Portuguese refused to go without their pre-Lent festival. REUTERS/Jose Manuel Ribeiro

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A carnival reveller with an image of a Portuguese national flag printed on her face, whistles at the Torres Vedras parade. The Portuguese have mostly quietly accepted reforms in the labour market, soaring unemployment and cuts to welfare to rein in their debt mountain - but calls to cancel the centuries-old tradition of carnival went a step too far. The government tried, in the name of austerity imposed by international lenders, to force the end of Tuesday's public holiday but the country effectively shut down all the same as the Portuguese refused to go without their pre-Lent festival. REUTERS/Jose Manuel Ribeiro View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Feb 22, 2012 10:40 PM IST

A carnival reveller with an image of a Portuguese national flag printed on her face, whistles at the Torres Vedras parade. The Portuguese have mostly quietly accepted reforms in the labour market, soaring unemployment and cuts to welfare to rein in their debt mountain - but calls to cancel the centuries-old tradition of carnival went a step too far. The government tried, in the name of austerity imposed by international lenders, to force the end of Tuesday's public holiday but the country effectively shut down all the same as the Portuguese refused to go without their pre-Lent festival. REUTERS/Jose Manuel Ribeiro

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People watch the carnival parade in front of a job center at Torres Vedras. The Portuguese have mostly quietly accepted reforms in the labour market, soaring unemployment and cuts to welfare to rein in their debt mountain - but calls to cancel the centuries-old tradition of carnival went a step too far. The government tried, in the name of austerity imposed by international lenders, to force the end of Tuesday's public holiday but the country effectively shut down all the same as the Portuguese refused to go without their pre-Lent festival. REUTERS/Jose Manuel Ribeiro View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Feb 22, 2012 10:40 PM IST

People watch the carnival parade in front of a job center at Torres Vedras. The Portuguese have mostly quietly accepted reforms in the labour market, soaring unemployment and cuts to welfare to rein in their debt mountain - but calls to cancel the centuries-old tradition of carnival went a step too far. The government tried, in the name of austerity imposed by international lenders, to force the end of Tuesday's public holiday but the country effectively shut down all the same as the Portuguese refused to go without their pre-Lent festival. REUTERS/Jose Manuel Ribeiro

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A carnival reveller poses in front of a float depicting European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso (L) giving water to Portuguese Prime Minister Passos Coelho (R), alongside Foreign Minister Paulo Portas and IMF delegation chief Paul Thomson (back), at the Torres Vedras parade. The Portuguese have mostly quietly accepted reforms in the labour market, soaring unemployment and cuts to welfare to rein in their debt mountain - but calls to cancel the centuries-old tradition of carnival went a step too far.The government tried, in the name of austerity imposed by international lenders, to force the end of Tuesday's public holiday but the country effectively shut down all the same as the Portuguese refused to go without their pre-Lent festival. REUTERS/Jose Manuel Ribeiro View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Feb 22, 2012 10:40 PM IST

A carnival reveller poses in front of a float depicting European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso (L) giving water to Portuguese Prime Minister Passos Coelho (R), alongside Foreign Minister Paulo Portas and IMF delegation chief Paul Thomson (back), at the Torres Vedras parade. The Portuguese have mostly quietly accepted reforms in the labour market, soaring unemployment and cuts to welfare to rein in their debt mountain - but calls to cancel the centuries-old tradition of carnival went a step too far.The government tried, in the name of austerity imposed by international lenders, to force the end of Tuesday's public holiday but the country effectively shut down all the same as the Portuguese refused to go without their pre-Lent festival. REUTERS/Jose Manuel Ribeiro

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A carnival reveller reacts between Euro bank notes and a float depicting Portuguese Prime Minister Passos Coelho at the Torres Vedras parade. The Portuguese have mostly quietly accepted reforms in the labour market, soaring unemployment and cuts to welfare to rein in their debt mountain - but calls to cancel the centuries-old tradition of carnival went a step too far. The government tried, in the name of austerity imposed by international lenders, to force the end of Tuesday's public holiday but the country effectively shut down all the same as the Portuguese refused to go without their pre-Lent festival. REUTERS/Jose Manuel Ribeiro View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Feb 22, 2012 10:40 PM IST

A carnival reveller reacts between Euro bank notes and a float depicting Portuguese Prime Minister Passos Coelho at the Torres Vedras parade. The Portuguese have mostly quietly accepted reforms in the labour market, soaring unemployment and cuts to welfare to rein in their debt mountain - but calls to cancel the centuries-old tradition of carnival went a step too far. The government tried, in the name of austerity imposed by international lenders, to force the end of Tuesday's public holiday but the country effectively shut down all the same as the Portuguese refused to go without their pre-Lent festival. REUTERS/Jose Manuel Ribeiro

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Carnival revellers carry caricatures of German Chancellor Angela Merkel (L) and French President Nicolas Sarkozy at the Torres Vedras parade. The Portuguese have mostly quietly accepted reforms in the labour market, soaring unemployment and cuts to welfare to rein in their debt mountain - but calls to cancel the centuries-old tradition of carnival went a step too far. The government tried, in the name of austerity imposed by international lenders, to force the end of Tuesday's public holiday but the country effectively shut down all the same as the Portuguese refused to go without their pre-Lent festival. REUTERS/Jose Manuel Ribeir View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Feb 22, 2012 10:40 PM IST

Carnival revellers carry caricatures of German Chancellor Angela Merkel (L) and French President Nicolas Sarkozy at the Torres Vedras parade. The Portuguese have mostly quietly accepted reforms in the labour market, soaring unemployment and cuts to welfare to rein in their debt mountain - but calls to cancel the centuries-old tradition of carnival went a step too far. The government tried, in the name of austerity imposed by international lenders, to force the end of Tuesday's public holiday but the country effectively shut down all the same as the Portuguese refused to go without their pre-Lent festival. REUTERS/Jose Manuel Ribeir

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A man takes a photo of a carnival float depicting European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso (L) giving water to Portuguese Prime Minister Passos Coelho (R), alongside Foreign Minister Paulo Portas and IMF delegation chief Paul Thomson (back), at the Torres Vedras parade. The Portuguese have mostly quietly accepted reforms in the labour market, soaring unemployment and cuts to welfare to rein in their debt mountain - but calls to cancel the centuries-old tradition of carnival went a step too far.The government tried, in the name of austerity imposed by international lenders, to force the end of Tuesday's public holiday but the country effectively shut down all the same as the Portuguese refused to go without their pre-Lent festival. REUTERS/Jose Manuel Ribeiro View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Feb 22, 2012 10:40 PM IST

A man takes a photo of a carnival float depicting European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso (L) giving water to Portuguese Prime Minister Passos Coelho (R), alongside Foreign Minister Paulo Portas and IMF delegation chief Paul Thomson (back), at the Torres Vedras parade. The Portuguese have mostly quietly accepted reforms in the labour market, soaring unemployment and cuts to welfare to rein in their debt mountain - but calls to cancel the centuries-old tradition of carnival went a step too far.The government tried, in the name of austerity imposed by international lenders, to force the end of Tuesday's public holiday but the country effectively shut down all the same as the Portuguese refused to go without their pre-Lent festival. REUTERS/Jose Manuel Ribeiro

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Carnival revellers wearing costumes of bowling pins bearing the words "job" (R) and "pension" participate in the Torres Vedras parade. The Portuguese have mostly quietly accepted reforms in the labour market, soaring unemployment and cuts to welfare to rein in their debt mountain - but calls to cancel the centuries-old tradition of carnival went a step too far. The government tried, in the name of austerity imposed by international lenders, to force the end of Tuesday's public holiday but the country effectively shut down all the same as the Portuguese refused to go without their pre-Lent festival. REUTERS/Jose Manuel Ribeiro View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Feb 22, 2012 10:40 PM IST

Carnival revellers wearing costumes of bowling pins bearing the words "job" (R) and "pension" participate in the Torres Vedras parade. The Portuguese have mostly quietly accepted reforms in the labour market, soaring unemployment and cuts to welfare to rein in their debt mountain - but calls to cancel the centuries-old tradition of carnival went a step too far. The government tried, in the name of austerity imposed by international lenders, to force the end of Tuesday's public holiday but the country effectively shut down all the same as the Portuguese refused to go without their pre-Lent festival. REUTERS/Jose Manuel Ribeiro

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