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Maharashtra HSC results: Pune’s success stories

Pune district has topped with 89.84% among the three districts in the division, but is still lower than last year

pune Updated: May 31, 2018 17:24 IST
Ananya Barua
Ananya Barua
Hindustan Times, Pune
Pune,HSC,results
Vanshika Joshi, a disabled student who scored 71% in the Higher Secondary Certificate examination, congratulated by other toppers at SP College in Pune on Wednesday.(SANKET WANKHADE/HT PHOTO)

Be the best of yourself, says Vanshika Joshi

18-year-old Vanshika Joshi could not attend school all her life due to a birth deformity. Her physical limitations did not stop her from going to one of the top junior colleges in the city, Sir Parashurambhau (SP) College and secure a percentage of 70.77% in the HSC exams.

Speaking about her achievement, Joshi said, “My marks have been as per my expectations. I thank the teachers who have been extremely patient and have encouraged me. My left leg is shorter than the right one and this is a hereditary deformity. The schools in my locality did not have the necessary facilities for the disabled back then. So, I was denied the experience of campus life as a child. I got to experience this in the college. I would only go to the schools to give the exams externally. Nevertheless, that itself has been quite a learning.”

A resident of Dhankawadi, Joshi has been home-schooled by Nilima Bhambure, a teacher. “I have been lucky to have such a guiding light. She has been teaching me from Class 8 to 12. And throughout the four years, apart from academic lessons, what I have learnt and would like others like me to learn, is to never give up and never to compare oneself with others, because becoming the best version of your own self is the highest achievement,” said Joshi.

Wastepicker’s daughter Varsha scores 84 per cent

Varsha jadhav shine with 84.46 per cent in the HSC board exam. (SANKET WANKHADE/HT PHOTO)

For 21-year old Varsha Jadhav, daughter of two parents who work as waste pickers, deciding to resume her education after a gap of four years was difficult. However, her perseverance to change her own destiny and that of her family, led her to shine with 84.46 per cent in the HSC board exam, declared on Wednesday.

“I love to read and know more about the world. I wanted my world to expand and to help my siblings to experience the same. Soon I realised that this can only happen if I educate myself properly, and so, in spite of dropping out from school after Class 5 in 2009, I urged my father to help me resume studies in 2015, when I gave my Class 10 boards externally,” saidJadhav.

She had help from her 17-year old sister, Rani Jadhav, who also appeared for the HSC boards this year, scoring 74 per cent.

Her father, mother andgrandparents work as a waste-pickers for the NGO,Kagad Kach Patra Kashtakari Panchayat (KKPKP).

Living in a 100 sq ft room in government quarters in Pimpri, which was initially a slum, this family of 10 members has made the locality proud. With her success, Jadhav wants to set an example for her six siblings - four sisters and two brothers.“I had to drop out for several reasons, money being the most prominent one. Both my parents and my grandparents are waste-pickers and we hardly earn Rs 3,000 in a month.I did not want this to be my fate or for my brothers and sisters. I want them andmyself to rise above this and succeed in life,” she added.

Night college topper Dhindle

On Wednesday, after the Maharashtra state board declared the HSC 2018 results, Akash Dhindle, was overjoyed with his results. He was the fifth student from his village to come first in the night college category. The village has had the night college topper now for five consecutive years.

Dhindle, 18, from Ghisar village, Velhe taluka of Pune district, secured 79.23 per cent. The son of a farmer, Dhindle had to resort to a part-time job at a cosmetic shop in Tulsibaug to work towards fulfilling his dream of becoming a company secretary (CS).

“I have been working for eight hours a day, for the past two years to pay for my education. The condition that I am in, is not by choice, but I chose to have it. It is a necessity for me to work in the day and then study from 6.30 to 9.30 pm,” said Dhindle.

IDhindle has learnt to befriend his teachers and make studying his favourite hobby. “I don’t have time to look beyond my education. It is the ultimate goal for me. Like the last five students from our village, I want to be an example for all the children in the village,” he added.

First Published: May 31, 2018 17:23 IST