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Tuesday, Nov 19, 2019

Poor climatic conditions: mango arrival drops by 50% in Pune

According to the traders, since there has been a drop of 50 per cent in the production of mangoes, the prices should have been doubled. However, that has not happened.

pune Updated: Apr 20, 2019 17:28 IST
HT Correspondent
HT Correspondent
Hindustan Times, Pune
The price of mangoes has not changed much as compared to last year. A mango vendor at Mahatma Phule Mandai.
The price of mangoes has not changed much as compared to last year. A mango vendor at Mahatma Phule Mandai. (RAVINDRA JOSHI/HT PHOTO)
         

The damage to the mango flowering crop due to prolonged winter season has led to a decreased fruit setting resulting in a poor arrival in the market. The Agriculture Produce Market Committee (APMC) Pune has reported at least 50 per cent drop in the arrival of mangoes as compared to last year.

Arvind More, a mango trader at APMC Pune said, “As a result of the adverse climatic condition during the flowering season, the production of mango has been affected badly. As of now (April) 3,500 boxes (of four dozen mangoes each) are arriving daily. Last year in the same month, we witnessed the arrival of around 6,500 boxes daily.”

According to the traders, since there has been a drop of 50 per cent in the production of mangoes, the prices should have been doubled. However, that has not happened. The prices of the mangoes the mangoes this year are at par with prices of the previous year. Currently at APMC Pune, one dozen Alphonso mangoes are sold at ₹1,000-1,200 as compared to ₹ 800-1,000 during the same period last year. The prices have not risen drastically.

“Yes, as of now, the prices are under control because everyone is busy with the elections and there is a very low demand for mangoes,” More said.

Sharad Paranjape, president of Kelashi Mango Grower Association said, “The flowering and fruit initiation was badly affected. The mangoes which survived the cold condition are now facing problem in fruit development because of daily temperatures which have already crossed 38 degree Celsius mark.”