Nepal’s famed Pashupatinath Temple is on slippery ground

Published on Mar 31, 2017 12:51 PM IST

A geologist in Nepal, who has been studying the land structure of various heritage sites in the country, has warned that land creeping is threatening the famed Pashupatinath Temple.

Nepalese Hindu devotees wait to fill pots with water from the Bagmati River at the Pashupatinath Temple during the month-long Swasthani festival in Kathmandu on January 27, 2017.(AFP File Photo)
Nepalese Hindu devotees wait to fill pots with water from the Bagmati River at the Pashupatinath Temple during the month-long Swasthani festival in Kathmandu on January 27, 2017.(AFP File Photo)
Kathmandu | ByANI

A geologist in Nepal, who has been studying the land structure of various heritage sites in the country, has warned that land creeping is threatening the famed Pashupatinath Temple.

Land creeping is the slow downward progression of rock and soil. It also refers to slow deformation of such materials due to prolonged pressure and stress.

“We are working for the stability of the Pashupati Kshetra, the Swayambhu Area and Changu Narayan Area for the last 10 years and this is our regular process of the observations and collecting of data,” said geologist Ranjan Kumar Dahal.

“When we look at the Pashupati area, especially the Pashupati Temple and the river bank of the temple below the staircase from where we can go to the Pashupati Temple, we found that basically the whole mass is now in continuous creep and this is the main thing we will explore in more detail as they are creating lots of cracks on the slope,” he added.

The Pashupatinath Temple is a famous temple and pilgrimage site for Hindus, located on the banks of river Bagmati in Kathmandu.

The temple has a long history which appears in various manuscripts and religious texts, attracts pilgrims from around the world.

Experts have witnessed few bulges and deformation on the walls, which clearly suggests that the mass is moving down.

The area below the Slesmantak Forest, the place where Lord Shiva and Parvati are believed to have spent a lot of time, is home to numerous Shivalinga – traditional idol representing the deity Shiva.

Experts have claimed that a replica of Shiva in the site is being pushed upward because of creeping beneath the surface.

Geo-scientists have termed the danger to be at the medium level and have also suggested mitigation measures to prevent further danger.

Dr Dahal has suggested sealing of cracks on the surface as soon as possible and said that drainage system of temple should be managed properly.

Experts said the tradition of Bramhanal – a drainage system that carries the water and the milk offered deity – as the reason for land creeping.

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