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Saturday, Nov 16, 2019

‘AIIMS trauma centre processes are very similar to those in Israel’

Before the centre became fully operational in 2007, a group of doctors were trained at Rambam Hospital in Haifa, Israel, a region that was prone to frequent rocket attacks.

delhi Updated: Jun 23, 2019 05:59 IST
Anonna Dutt
Anonna Dutt
Hindustan Times, New Delhi
Apart from the Israeli model, a pilot project based on the Australian health system is on.
Apart from the Israeli model, a pilot project based on the Australian health system is on.(HT Photo)
         

Few people know that Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Centre (JPNATC), referred to as the AIIMS Trauma Centre, was built with expertise from Israel, which has arguably the world’s best first-responder system and trauma services.

“Israel has an unfortunate experience with trauma medicine, mass casualty, and emergency preparedness and response. We are not happy with the experience, but we are happy to share the experience with others,” said Ambassador Gil Haskel, head of Israel’s agency for international development cooperation MASHAV, who visited the Trauma Centre on Friday.

Before the centre became fully operational in 2007, a group of doctors were trained at Rambam Hospital in Haifa, Israel, a region that was prone to frequent rocket attacks.

It takes less than five minutes to shift a patient from to the operation theatre at AIIMS trauma centre. It has live display boards with details of patients in the emergency ward, and colour-coded zoning for patient management — red for critical, yellow for under observation and green for minimal care.

The protocols were implemented by Dr Sanjeev Bhoi, professor of emergency medicine, and the software used to track patient status in the hospital, was indigenously developed under Dr Deepak Aggarwal, professor of neurosurgery.

“The processes here are very similar to the ones in Israel. It good to learn that the collaboration that started with a group of people coming to Israel has now led to AIIMS becoming an authority on trauma care in India,” said Ambassador Haskel,

Apart from the Israeli model, a pilot project based on the Australian health system is on. The software records medical interventions on critical patients with a time stamp. It prompts doctors to perform certain interventions that are especially helpful when junior doctors are on duty to ensure standard quality of care.

The centre is currently in the process of expanding the emergency department for better managing of mass casualty and disaster management. The hospital has managed 50 mass casualty situations since its inception, according to hospital administration. The remodelling of the area will create space for a modular operation theatre within the emergency department, speeding up treatment.

The central government is planning to create a comprehensive emergency and trauma care centre at all the 22 AIIMS coming up across the country, instituting protocols developed by AIIMS trauma centre.

However, pre-hospital care remains a challenge. “The connectivity of ambulances even in Delhi is not adequate, from what I have learnt from colleagues here. In Israel, all our ambulances are equipped with full medical gear to perform a surgery too, if needed. What this means is that the treatment starts even before the patient reaches the hospital. And, we will be willing to share our experience with pre-hospital care with India as well,” Haskel said.