CBSE Class 10 result: Delhi government schools deliver worst performance since 2007 | education | Hindustan Times
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CBSE Class 10 result: Delhi government schools deliver worst performance since 2007

CBSE Class 10 result: Only 69.32% of the government school students who appeared for the exams passed the exam, while 89.45% of the private school students have done so.

Board Exams 2018 Updated: May 30, 2018 16:41 IST
Hindustan Times
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CBSE Class 10 result: The last time the board exams were compulsory was in 2009, when 89.44% of government school students in Delhi and 90.71% of the private school students had passed the exam.(Getty Images/iStockphoto)

After putting up a great performance in the Class 12 board exams, Delhi government schools did not inspire the same confidence in the Class 10 Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) exams, with over a 20 percentage point decline in the pass percentage since last year, and the worst performance since 2007.

Earlier this week, Delhi government schools had grabbed headlines as over 90% of the government school students who appeared in the CBSE Class 12 examinations passed the exam for the first time in 20 years, marking their best performance in two decades. They also outperformed private schools for the third year in a row, giving the Delhi government added reason to rejoice.

In the Class 10 exams though the overall pass percentage of Delhi marginally increased from 78.09% last year to 78.62% this year. The pass percentages of both government schools and private schools have declined.

However, both Jawahar Navodaya Vidyalayas (JNVs) and Kendriya Vidyalayas (KVs) in the Delhi region, both of which fall under the purview of the centre, have posted pass percentages over 97%, and this may have contributed to the overall rise in Delhi’s pass percentage.

Only 69.32% of the government school students who appeared for the exams passed the exam, while 89.45% of the private school students have done so. The last time the board exams were compulsory was in 2009, when 89.44% of government school students in Delhi and 90.71% of the private school students had passed the exam.

Saumya Gupta, the director of education, said that they had been expecting this drop.

“Even private schools had a pass percentage of around 96.67% last year, and their pass percentage has also declined. Our students were not used to the board exam pattern and we were expecting a slight drop. Last year, these kids attempted a class 9 exam with just six months’ portion. They have never faced an exam where they have to go to a different centre, and are to be tested on the full year’s syllabus,” she said.

Delhi education minister Manish Sisodia said when they had conducted a pre-board exam for class 10 students, the pass percentage at the time was only 30%.

“We had sent show-cause notices to teachers and heads of schools also, asking why the pre-board result was so low... After that, I was not even certain that we would have a 50% pass percentage, but at least we have reached 70%. I would like to congratulate the teachers,” he said.

Sisodia added that with education policies, including the no detention policy, the “foundation” of the education system had been weakened and they were working to strengthen it through government campaigns such as the Mission Buniyaad and Chunauti Mission.

Gupta also added that the change in the exam pattern from CCE to exam based, may have adversely affected the results. “Last year students were being tested for slightly different set of skills,” she said.

CBSE had replaced the board exams with a Continuous Comprehensive Evaluation (CCE) eight years ago, and this was the first batch to write the re-introduced compulsory board exams.

Class 12 students are used to the pattern, as they attempt an exam with the full year’s syllabus in Class 11 also, and hence were able to perform better, explained Gupta.

Annie Koshi, the principal of the St Mary’s School said that if done properly, the CCE would have been “an excellent method to assess,” however, it had been reduced to a series of tests rather than a holistic approach to asses all aspects of a child’s education.

“The question is whether we needed this exam at all. I am of the opinion that it is not necessary to give board exams in class 10... We are still stuck in the colonial mindset of standardised testing. We had tried CCE, but we did not have enough understanding or enough teacher training for it to be effective,” said Ameeta Wattal, the principal of Springdales School Pusa Road.

First Published: May 30, 2018 16:41 IST