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Home / Education / Fake mark sheets issue: Maharashtra removes 184 MBA, MMS aspirants from merit list

Fake mark sheets issue: Maharashtra removes 184 MBA, MMS aspirants from merit list

Many of these candidates are said to have submitted forged scorecards or entered inflated scores of two private entrance tests – AIMS Test for Management Studies (ATMA) and Management Aptitude Test (MAT) – while applying for admissions.

education Updated: Aug 02, 2019 14:04 IST
Musab Qazi
Musab Qazi
Hindustan Times, Mumbai
Admissions of 25 MBA and MMS students has been cancelled owing to the discrepancies in their entrance exam scores.
Admissions of 25 MBA and MMS students has been cancelled owing to the discrepancies in their entrance exam scores. (HT File / Photo used for representational purpose)

The Maharashtra state common entrance test (CET) cell has removed 184 candidates from its all-India merit list for the Master of Business Administration (MBA) and Master of Management Studies (MMS) courses and cancelled the admissions of 25 students owing to the discrepancies in their entrance exam scores.

Many of these candidates are said to have submitted forged scorecards or entered inflated scores of two private entrance tests – AIMS Test for Management Studies (ATMA) and Management Aptitude Test (MAT) – while applying for admissions. Most of these candidates had claimed to have scored above 99 percentile, which earned them top positions in the state’s merit list for the 15% All India quota seats in B-schools.

“We had issued notices to all the candidates who had discrepancies in their scores. Only, few of them have responded. After waiting for a few days, we decided to remove all the candidates, except those who had minor errors in their applications, from the list,” said a CET Cell official.

However, the cell is yet to issue a revised merit list, as the admission process has been put on hold following the Bombay high court (HC) directing the state to redo the entire process by treating Jamnalal Bajaj Institute of Management Studies (JBIMS) as an autonomous college. “We are yet to receive a copy of the judgement. Once it’s clear how the revised admissions are to be conducted we will start the process anew,” said the official.

The first round of admissions was already over before the court’s verdict on July 25, when the second list of college allotments was to be issued.

The CET Cell has now asked the have asked the institutes that had admitted the alleged offenders in the first round, to initiate actions against them. The chairman of Admission Regulating Authority (ARA) will decide if there’s an action to be taken against the other candidates, who weren’t admitted, the official added.

The candidates and institutes are upset with the malpractices and the subsequent delay in admissions. “We are suffering due to incompetence of the authorities. The colleges should have begun by now. It will now be impossible for colleges to cover the syllabus. The delay will also affect our placement prospects, as we will lag behind students in other states. There should be legal action against the offenders,” said Kshitij Kapoor, a candidate from Delhi.

Kalim Khan, director, Rizvi Institute of Management Studies and Research, Bandra, said that the state’s admission woes has put a question mark on the sanctity of the entire process. “Increasingly, the students are losing faith in the state’s admission process, as there’s one problem or the other every year. The state has ruined the master’s programme,” he said.

Khan added that the institutes are paying the price of the authorities’ ‘lackadaisical’ approach. The state begins the admission process later than the most. There’s a two month lag in the academic year between the colleges under the state and other autonomous institutes. As a result, most of the students secure their admissions elsewhere and we get what’s leftover. Currently, the institutes are stand-by as there’s no communication from CET Cell. There should be some accountability,” he said.