MBBS, BDS admissions in Maharashtra: Old domicile rule is back | mumbai news | Hindustan Times
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MBBS, BDS admissions in Maharashtra: Old domicile rule is back

The Supreme Court recently struck down the decision of the state Directorate of Medical Education & Research (DMER) to make all three requirements compulsory for admissions to MBBS and BDS courses for 2018-19.

mumbai Updated: Apr 13, 2018 12:36 IST
Shreya Bhandary
Shreya Bhandary
Hindustan Times
Mumbai,MBBS,BDS
Admissions to all seats will be based on the results of National Eligibility-cum-Entrance Test (NEET), which will be conducted across the country on May 6(FILE)

In relief for medical aspirants, 85% of the seats in Maharashtra will be allotted to those who have either cleared Class 10 and 12 from Maharashtra or those who have cleared only Class 12 from the state, but have a valid domicile (proof of living in the state for 15 years) certificate.

The Supreme Court recently struck down the decision of the state Directorate of Medical Education & Research (DMER) to make all three requirements compulsory for admissions to MBBS and BDS courses for 2018-19. This means, a student will be eligible if he fits in one of the two criteria too. “Most states have strict rules for quota seats. We wanted to make sure that students from Maharashtra have an advantage over students from other states. The SC, however, rejected our decision,” said Dr Pravin Shingare, director, DMER.

Admissions to all seats will be based on the results of National Eligibility-cum-Entrance Test (NEET), which will be conducted across the country on May 6. There are close to 2,800 seats in state medical and dental institutes.

Until 2016-17, students who have either passed Class 10 and 12 from Maharashtra or those who have cleared Class 12 from the state but had a valid domicile were eligible for 85% of the state’s seats. However, last year, the DMER decided to make all three documents compulsory— Class 10, Class 12 and domicile from the state -- leaving many students who had cleared Class 10 from outside Maharashtra, but wanted to pursue medical studies in the state unhappy.

Parents of these students said many of them stayed near the state borders, and it was often more convenient to send their children to schools that were a few km away from their home in other states. Students had filed a petition opposing this new rule and the Aurangabad bench of the Bombay high court had stayed the policy.

Stating the court’s stay last year was only applicable to last year’s batch, DMER decided to re-introduce compulsion for all three documents this year. The SC, however, rejected DMER’s decision again. “Two of the three conditions need to be fulfilled by students aiming for state’s seats,” said Shingare.