BMC wants Mumbai to get better amenities over the next 20 years | mumbai | Hindustan Times
  • Monday, Jun 18, 2018
  •   °C  
Today in New Delhi, India
Jun 18, 2018-Monday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

BMC wants Mumbai to get better amenities over the next 20 years

With maximising development of public amenities in the next 20 years as its focus, the BMC has introduced localised, micro-planning benchmarks for creation of different facilities in its draft Development Plan (DP) 2034.

mumbai Updated: Feb 17, 2015 19:25 IST
Poorvi Kulkarni

With maximising development of public amenities in the next 20 years as its focus, the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) has introduced localised, micro-planning benchmarks for creation of different facilities in its draft Development Plan (DP) 2034.

Mumbai has been divided into 150 planning sectors for microlevel and spatial development. The BMC has set varying benchmarks for educational, civic and social amenities at planning sector, ward and sub-city levels. Considering the land constraint, some of the benchmarks have also been scaled down, in comparison to the previous 1991 DP.

For instance, the allocation of 2 sq m a person (smpp) of open space for island city and 5 smpp for suburbs, proposed in the 1991 DP, has been reduced to a uniform 2 smpp for the entire city. The existing availability of open space in the city is 1.24 smpp.

The BMC has also planned several measures to ensure it achieves the benchmarks, unlike the earlier DP. A case in point could be the proposal to get developers of largescale projects to reserve land for public amenities. So, if 2,000sqm area is being developed, the developer will have to reserve 10% for public amenities. Around 15% of the land will have to be utilised for amenities, if an industrial area is being used for residential or commercial purposes. Any development on cotton mill land will mandate reserving 20% of the area for public amenities.

The land made available from such pooling will be assigned for recreational open spaces, markets, welfare centres, police chowkies, libraries, municipal chowkies, dispensaries, fire stations, among others. “The land will be allocated taking the deficiency in the amenities in the area into account and priorities will be decided with the help of radar diagrams [to be prepared] for each planning sector,” states the draft DP 2034.

A higher FSI has also been proposed for built-up amenities, with 385.9 hectares proposed to be developed under the scheme.

To promote inclusionary housing, developers taking up projects on more than 2000 sqm will have to hand over 10% of the built-up area to the civic body in the form of small tenements. The BMC will, in turn, use these tenements for project-affected households, businesses and community workplaces for restoration of livelihood of displaced households.

The civic body has also proposed to increase the road network in the city, from 18% of the total developed land to 20% of the total developed land in DP 2034. Around 12% of the land in each of the 150 planning sectors in the city has been proposed to be developed as road network. “Pedestrians and other uses were not specified in the earlier plans. In DP 2034, the right to roads has been proposed and the allocation for footpaths and carriageways has been made in the development control regulations,” states the draft DP.