Canada’s army comes to rescue after devastating floods

Updated On May 10, 2017 08:57 AM IST

Canada mobilized its army to help thousands of flood victims try to hold back waters and save their homes Monday after the worst flood in half a century struck, but authorities were optimistic that rising water levels would soon crest. In British Columbia, on the opposite side of the country, the same combination of rain and snowmelt has caused flooding and mudslides that left at least two people missing, including the fire chief of the village of Cache Creek who had been out checking water levels.

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An overhead view showing the flooded residential Montreal suburb of Pierrefonds, Quebec. Canada mobilized its army to help thousands of flood victims try to hold back waters and save their homes Monday after the worst flood in half a century struck, but authorities were optimistic that rising water levels would soon crest. (Christinne Muschi/REUTERS) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on May 10, 2017 08:57 AM IST

An overhead view showing the flooded residential Montreal suburb of Pierrefonds, Quebec. Canada mobilized its army to help thousands of flood victims try to hold back waters and save their homes Monday after the worst flood in half a century struck, but authorities were optimistic that rising water levels would soon crest. (Christinne Muschi/REUTERS)

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An overhead view showing the flooded residential neighbourhood of Rigaud, west of Montreal. Several rivers and lakes have overflowed their banks in Quebec province, between Gatineau in the Canadian capital region and Montreal 200 kilometers (125 miles) downstream. (Christinne Muschi/REUTERS) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on May 10, 2017 08:57 AM IST

An overhead view showing the flooded residential neighbourhood of Rigaud, west of Montreal. Several rivers and lakes have overflowed their banks in Quebec province, between Gatineau in the Canadian capital region and Montreal 200 kilometers (125 miles) downstream. (Christinne Muschi/REUTERS)

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Canadian soldiers wait with their boat while checking on residents in a flooded residential area in Gatineau. The ground is saturated and unable to absorb any more water. (Chris Wattie/REUTERS) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on May 10, 2017 08:57 AM IST

Canadian soldiers wait with their boat while checking on residents in a flooded residential area in Gatineau. The ground is saturated and unable to absorb any more water. (Chris Wattie/REUTERS)

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A tractor pulls a trailer through a flooded residential area in Gatineau. Some 2,500 homes in Quebec and more than 300 in Ontario have been flooded, and at least 1,500 people have been ordered to evacuate -- most of them in the Canadian capital region. (Chris Wattie/REUTERS) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on May 10, 2017 08:57 AM IST

A tractor pulls a trailer through a flooded residential area in Gatineau. Some 2,500 homes in Quebec and more than 300 in Ontario have been flooded, and at least 1,500 people have been ordered to evacuate -- most of them in the Canadian capital region. (Chris Wattie/REUTERS)

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Volunteers transport sandbags in a flooded residential area in Gatineau. In Pierrefonds, one of the hardest-hit regions near Montreal, Johanne Aubin spent the morning pumping water from her basement using a pump from her backyard swimming pool. (Chris Wattie/REUTERS) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on May 10, 2017 08:57 AM IST

Volunteers transport sandbags in a flooded residential area in Gatineau. In Pierrefonds, one of the hardest-hit regions near Montreal, Johanne Aubin spent the morning pumping water from her basement using a pump from her backyard swimming pool. (Chris Wattie/REUTERS)

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Canadian soldiers wait in their boat as a city official checks on residents. The flooding took her and most others here by surprise, and she barely had time to erect a small sandbag wall around her property. (Chris Wattie/REUTERS) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on May 10, 2017 08:57 AM IST

Canadian soldiers wait in their boat as a city official checks on residents. The flooding took her and most others here by surprise, and she barely had time to erect a small sandbag wall around her property. (Chris Wattie/REUTERS)

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An abandoned car with a sign reading 'R.I.P.' in the windshield is seen in a flooded residential area in Gatineau. After days of fighting an exhausting battle to hold back the waters, often in vain, despair has started to set in. (Chris Wattie/REUTERS) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on May 10, 2017 08:57 AM IST

An abandoned car with a sign reading 'R.I.P.' in the windshield is seen in a flooded residential area in Gatineau. After days of fighting an exhausting battle to hold back the waters, often in vain, despair has started to set in. (Chris Wattie/REUTERS)

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Men throw sandbags outside a home in a flooded residential area in Gatineau. Most of the streets here are flooded, forcing locals to travel by canoe or other small boat. (Chris Wattie/REUTERS) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on May 10, 2017 08:57 AM IST

Men throw sandbags outside a home in a flooded residential area in Gatineau. Most of the streets here are flooded, forcing locals to travel by canoe or other small boat. (Chris Wattie/REUTERS)

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Resident David Swidzinsky has been ferrying neighbors to safety, or back to their homes to collect precious belongings that had been missed in the rush to get out when a state of emergency was declared. (Chris Wattie/REUTERS) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on May 10, 2017 08:57 AM IST

Resident David Swidzinsky has been ferrying neighbors to safety, or back to their homes to collect precious belongings that had been missed in the rush to get out when a state of emergency was declared. (Chris Wattie/REUTERS)

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Men struggle with a pontoon boat loaded with sandbags. Across eastern Canada, hundreds of thousands of sandbags have been used and Ottawa has asked suppliers for up to four million more, said officials. (Chris Wattie/REUTERS) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on May 10, 2017 08:57 AM IST

Men struggle with a pontoon boat loaded with sandbags. Across eastern Canada, hundreds of thousands of sandbags have been used and Ottawa has asked suppliers for up to four million more, said officials. (Chris Wattie/REUTERS)

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Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale called it the worst Canadian flood in “50 years” but added that the situation was improving in Ontario, where high water levels in Lake Ontario threatened coastal communities including parts of Toronto, Belleville to the east and the Thousand Islands region, which is home to fabled 19th century mansions and cottages. (Chris Wattie/REUTERS) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on May 10, 2017 08:57 AM IST

Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale called it the worst Canadian flood in “50 years” but added that the situation was improving in Ontario, where high water levels in Lake Ontario threatened coastal communities including parts of Toronto, Belleville to the east and the Thousand Islands region, which is home to fabled 19th century mansions and cottages. (Chris Wattie/REUTERS)

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A man plays his guitar as he travels in a boat to collect water supplies in a flooded residential neighbourhood in Ile Bizard. (Christinne Muschi/REUTERS) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on May 10, 2017 08:57 AM IST

A man plays his guitar as he travels in a boat to collect water supplies in a flooded residential neighbourhood in Ile Bizard. (Christinne Muschi/REUTERS)

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People fill sandbags to try to fend off the floodwaters in Deux-Montagnes. Heavy rains and melting snowpack across Quebec have so far flooded thousands of residences in the province, forcing the evacuation of people in almost 150 municipalities. (Ryan Remiorz/The Canadian Press/AP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on May 10, 2017 08:57 AM IST

People fill sandbags to try to fend off the floodwaters in Deux-Montagnes. Heavy rains and melting snowpack across Quebec have so far flooded thousands of residences in the province, forcing the evacuation of people in almost 150 municipalities. (Ryan Remiorz/The Canadian Press/AP)

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Residents use canoes to access their home in Deux-Montagnes, Quebec. (Ryan Remiorz/The Canadian Press/AP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on May 10, 2017 08:57 AM IST

Residents use canoes to access their home in Deux-Montagnes, Quebec. (Ryan Remiorz/The Canadian Press/AP)

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Pam Komm, 81, is helped by her daughter Sandra and son Wayne as they rescue her from her flooded home in Quyon. In British Columbia, on the opposite side of the country, the same combination of rain and snowmelt has caused flooding and mudslides that left at least two people missing, including the fire chief of the village of Cache Creek who had been out checking water levels. (PTI/AP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on May 10, 2017 08:57 AM IST

Pam Komm, 81, is helped by her daughter Sandra and son Wayne as they rescue her from her flooded home in Quyon. In British Columbia, on the opposite side of the country, the same combination of rain and snowmelt has caused flooding and mudslides that left at least two people missing, including the fire chief of the village of Cache Creek who had been out checking water levels. (PTI/AP)

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