Photos: Brazil flies in doctors to test Amazon ‘guardians’ for Covid-19

Brazil on October 5 concluded a three-week Covid-19 screening and diagnostics programme for the Guajajara indigenous group, also known as the "guardians of the forest" for their efforts to stop illegal loggers from invading their lands in the Amazon. There have been 447 deaths from Covid-19 so far among Brazil's 800,000 indigenous people and health care is only extended by the dedicated service to those living on designated reservations. President Jair Bolsonaro’s government has faced criticism at home and from international human rights groups for ignoring the plight of indigenous people in the face of the pandemic.

Updated On Oct 07, 2020 06:12 PM IST
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A member of the Brazilian Armed Forces medical team examines a child from the Guajajara indigenous group for Covid-19, at a community school in the village of Morro Branco, Brazil on October 4. The Brazilian military wrapped up on October 5 a three-week operation providing medical care to the Guajajara tribe, in response to criticism that Brazil was not protecting vulnerable indigenous people from the pandemic. (Adriano Machado / REUTERS)
Updated on Oct 07, 2020 06:12 PM IST

A member of the Brazilian Armed Forces medical team examines a child from the Guajajara indigenous group for Covid-19, at a community school in the village of Morro Branco, Brazil on October 4. The Brazilian military wrapped up on October 5 a three-week operation providing medical care to the Guajajara tribe, in response to criticism that Brazil was not protecting vulnerable indigenous people from the pandemic. (Adriano Machado / REUTERS)

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A woman from the Guajajara ethnic group holds a child in the village of Morro Branco on October 4. Guajajara leaders have praised the armed forces for air lifting doctors and nurses to do rapid Covid-19 tests and examine for other diseases, but also criticized the government’s indigenous health service SESAI for not protecting them against the novel coronavirus, Reuters reports. (Adriano Machado / REUTERS)
Updated on Oct 07, 2020 06:12 PM IST

A woman from the Guajajara ethnic group holds a child in the village of Morro Branco on October 4. Guajajara leaders have praised the armed forces for air lifting doctors and nurses to do rapid Covid-19 tests and examine for other diseases, but also criticized the government’s indigenous health service SESAI for not protecting them against the novel coronavirus, Reuters reports. (Adriano Machado / REUTERS)

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A Guajajara woman at a community school during check-ups in Morro Branco on October 4. There have been 447 deaths from COVID-19 so far among Brazil’s 800,000 indigenous people, according to SESAI, which only provides health care to those living on reservations. Another 388 have died off reservation in urban areas, according to the main indigenous umbrella organization APIB. (Adriano Machado / REUTERS)
Updated on Oct 07, 2020 06:12 PM IST

A Guajajara woman at a community school during check-ups in Morro Branco on October 4. There have been 447 deaths from COVID-19 so far among Brazil’s 800,000 indigenous people, according to SESAI, which only provides health care to those living on reservations. Another 388 have died off reservation in urban areas, according to the main indigenous umbrella organization APIB. (Adriano Machado / REUTERS)

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A man from the Guajajara ethnic community stands near graves in the village of Morro Branco on October 4. The Guajajara are best known for warrior teams dubbed the “guardians of the forest” set up to stop illegal loggers from invading their lands in growing numbers since environmental controls were relaxed by President Jair Bolsonaro. (Adriano Machado / REUTERS)
Updated on Oct 07, 2020 06:12 PM IST

A man from the Guajajara ethnic community stands near graves in the village of Morro Branco on October 4. The Guajajara are best known for warrior teams dubbed the “guardians of the forest” set up to stop illegal loggers from invading their lands in growing numbers since environmental controls were relaxed by President Jair Bolsonaro. (Adriano Machado / REUTERS)

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Members of the Brazilian Armed Forces veterinarian team examine the dog of a woman from the indigenous Guajajara ethnic group, in the village of Urucu Jurua on October 3. (Adriano Machado / REUTERS)
Updated on Oct 07, 2020 06:12 PM IST

Members of the Brazilian Armed Forces veterinarian team examine the dog of a woman from the indigenous Guajajara ethnic group, in the village of Urucu Jurua on October 3. (Adriano Machado / REUTERS)

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A woman from the Guajajara indigenous ethnic group holds a child at a community centre in the indigenous village of Urucu Jurua whiel a military personnel stands by, on October 3. Ythai Guajajara, a tribal spokeswoman, thanked the military for helping at such a critical time but told Reuters her people needed more access to health care than they were getting. (Adriano Machado / REUTERS)
Updated on Oct 07, 2020 06:12 PM IST

A woman from the Guajajara indigenous ethnic group holds a child at a community centre in the indigenous village of Urucu Jurua whiel a military personnel stands by, on October 3. Ythai Guajajara, a tribal spokeswoman, thanked the military for helping at such a critical time but told Reuters her people needed more access to health care than they were getting. (Adriano Machado / REUTERS)

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Jose Aldrinho Guajajara from the Guajajara ethnic group cured of the coronavirus looks on, in Bacurizinho on October 5. Indigenous and human rights groups such as the Indigenous Missionary Council (Cimi) and Human Rights Watch have criticized the government for reducing the SESAI’s scope and ignoring the plight of indigenous people in the face of the pandemic. (Adriano Machado / REUTERS)
Updated on Oct 07, 2020 06:12 PM IST

Jose Aldrinho Guajajara from the Guajajara ethnic group cured of the coronavirus looks on, in Bacurizinho on October 5. Indigenous and human rights groups such as the Indigenous Missionary Council (Cimi) and Human Rights Watch have criticized the government for reducing the SESAI’s scope and ignoring the plight of indigenous people in the face of the pandemic. (Adriano Machado / REUTERS)

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Women from the Guajajara ethnic group wait during health screenings by the military in Morro Branco on October 4. Carlos Travassos, a former head of isolated tribes at the government’s indigenous affairs agency Funai, told Reuters the medical outreach was just a media operation. “This was just for Englishmen to see,” he said, using a Brazilian expression for doing things for the sake of appearances. (Adriano Machado / REUTERS)
Updated on Oct 07, 2020 06:12 PM IST

Women from the Guajajara ethnic group wait during health screenings by the military in Morro Branco on October 4. Carlos Travassos, a former head of isolated tribes at the government’s indigenous affairs agency Funai, told Reuters the medical outreach was just a media operation. “This was just for Englishmen to see,” he said, using a Brazilian expression for doing things for the sake of appearances. (Adriano Machado / REUTERS)

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